Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

Maltreatment in Division 37. Donald Routh, in his book on the history of clinical child psychology (1994), has already placed my name in a history book, crediting me for my editorial activities.

The lessons I've learned are to work hard, be creative and visionary in your thinking, and surround yourself with outstanding professionals. Be open to input from others and realize that there is more to life than just psychology. Use your skills and your knowledge to open doors for others, and take the time to help open those doors. Be involved in your professional organizations by membership, attendance at meetings, and contributing to task forces, business meetings, and through presentation of papers or symposia. However, be active locally in organizations that benefit people less fortunate, or start groups for disenfranchised people or people in need of psychology's assistance. Be unselfish by giving psychology away to others through group work or through donation of time to speak, consult, or advocate on behalf of the needs of others. Be civic-minded and politically active by attending precinct meetings, joining political organizations of your choice, informing policymakers about psychology and what it can do for others, and even testifying on legislation at the state or local level. It is as imperative to me that psychologists be good and interested citizens as they are psychologists. Life will be richer because of our involvement, and we can contribute more to others.


REFERENCES

Routh, D. K. (1994). Clinical psychology since 1917: Science, practice, and organization. New York: Plenum Press.

Tuma, J. (Ed.) (1985). Proceedings of the Conference on Training Clinical Child Psychologists.(Division 12, Section 1, American Psychological Association.) Baton Rouge, LA: Land & Land Printers.

U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect. (1990). Child abuse and neglect: Critical first steps in response to a national emergency. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.

U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect. (1991). Creating caring communities: Blueprintjor an effective Federal policy on child abuse and neglect(Second Report). Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.

U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect. (1993). Neighbors helping neighbors: A new national strategy for the protection of children(Fourth Report). Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.

Willis, D. J. (Ed.). (1976a). Abused and neglected children [Special issue]. Journal ofPediatric Psychology, 1(2).

Willis, D. J. (Ed.). (1976b). Child neuropsychology [Special issue]. Journal of Pediatrtc Psychology, 1(3).

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Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Reviewers for Models of Achievement, Volume 3 ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • References xx
  • Part I - General Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Partners in Progress: Illuminating a New Vision of Women in Psychology 3
  • References 9
  • Part II - Historical and Social Contexts 11
  • Chapter 2 - A Century of Contrasts: Historical and Social Contexts of the 20th Century 13
  • References 24
  • Part III - Autobiographical Perspectives 27
  • Chapter 3 - Frances Mitchell Culbertson 29
  • Representative Publications 43
  • Chapter 4 - Patricia M. Bricklin 45
  • Representative Publications 61
  • Chapter 5 - Frances Degan Horowitz 63
  • References 75
  • Representative Publications 76
  • Chapter 6 - Norine G. Johnson 79
  • References 94
  • Representative Publications 95
  • Chapter 7 - Sandra Wood Scarr 97
  • References 110
  • Representative Publications 111
  • Chapter 8 - Dorothy W. Cantor 113
  • References 123
  • Chapter 9 125
  • References 132
  • Representative Publications 133
  • Chapter 10 135
  • Representative Publications 146
  • Chapter 11 149
  • References 164
  • Representative Publications 165
  • Chapter 12 169
  • References 180
  • Representative Publications 182
  • Chapter 13 185
  • References 197
  • Representative Publications 198
  • Chapter 14 201
  • References 215
  • Representative Publications 217
  • Chapter 15 219
  • References 234
  • Representative Publications 235
  • Chapter 16 239
  • References 253
  • Chapter 17 255
  • References 271
  • Representative Publications 272
  • Chapter 18 275
  • References 287
  • Representative Publications 291
  • Chapter 19 293
  • Representative Publications 303
  • Chapter 20 307
  • Representative Publications 325
  • Chapter 21 329
  • References 339
  • Representative Publications 341
  • Part IV - Achievement Patterns in the 20th Century *
  • Chapter 22 - Profiles and Patterns of Achievement for 53 Eminent Women: Synthesis and Resynthesis 3 343
  • References 419
  • Index 421
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