Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

Integrating my professional and personal lives was difficult, but I had a great deal of help from a non-sexist father, a very supportive husband, and two children who were very tolerant of my professional involvement. It is disheartening to note how little progress has been made on this front. Certainly, many more women are striving to combine working and raising families than was true when I began my career; it is estimated that two thirds of women with children are now in the workforce. Despite this, however, we still lack the sensible, inexpensive system of child care that most other industrialized countries have. I still hope that I will see the day when good fortune is not the major prerequisite for women to fully develop their capabilities.

On the basis of my early experiences, I would urge female readers to follow their own paths, and try to ignore the well-intended, but too cautious types of socialization we are all subjected to. As one of our early heroines, Amelia Earhart, once remarked: “Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace.” I wish you all the courage of your convictions.


REFERENCES

Bern, S. L. (1974). The measurement of psychological androgyny. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 42, 155–162.

Crosby, E (1984). The denial of personal discrimination. American Behavior Scientist, 27, 371–386.

Huston, A. C., Donnerstein, E., Fairchild, H., Feshbach, N. D., Katz, E A., Murray, J. E, Rubinstein, E. A., Wilcox, B. L., & Zuckerman, D. (1992). Big world, small screen: The role of television in American society. University of Nebraska Press: Lincoln & London.

Kagawa-Singer, M., Katz, E A., Taylor, D. A., & Vanderryn, J. H. M. (Eds.). (1996). Health issues for minority adolescents. University of Nebraska Press: Lincoln & London.

Katz, E A. (1963). The effects of labels on children's perception and discrimination learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66, 423–428.

Katz, EA. (1973a). Perception of racial cues in preschool children: A new look. Developmental Psychology, 8, 295–299.

Katz, E A. (1973b). Stimulus pre differentiation and modification of children's racial attitudes. Child Development, 44, 232–237.

Katz, E A. (Ed.). (1976). Towards the elimination of racism. New York: Fergamon Press

Katz, R A. (1979). The development of female identity. In C. Kopp & M.

Kirkpatrick (Eds.), Becoming female: Perspectives on development(pp. 3–28). New York: Plenum.

Katz, E A. (1980). Correlates of sex-role flexibility in children: Detailedfindings. National Institutes for Mental Health, Grant no. 29417 (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 191 584).

Katz, E A. (1983). Developmental foundations of gender and racial attitudes. In R. L. Leahy (Ed.), The child's construction of social inequality(pp. 41–78). New York: Academic.

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