Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

has been made possible by collaborations with Barry Green, an expert in oral touch, pain, and thermal sensations.

In 1995,1 was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and to the Society of Experimental Psychologists (SEP). SEP represents continuity in psychology back to 1904 (Boring, 1938). I was particularly curious to see SEP in action because I was briefly a member of the Psychological Round Table (PRT), the “youth-fired rebellion” founded in 1936 that originally called itself the Society of Experimenting Psychologists to pique the more august group (Stevens, 1974; Benjamin, 1977). Both groups originally excluded women. SEP admitted two women in 1929 but admitted no more until Eleanor Gibson in 1958 (Furumoto, 1988). PRT first admitted women in the 1970s.

In 1998, I received the first AChemS Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Chemical Senses. Psychophysics provided the tools that made this work on taste possible. Now taste can make a contribution to psychophysics. We know that perceived taste intensities are proportional to the number of fungiform papillae. Thus we can know something about a person's taste experience by looking at that person's tongue. This allows us to test the ability of psychophysical scales to capture differences across subjects. The scales that produce the best correlations between taste intensity and number of fungiform papillae are those most able to compare intensity experiences across subjects. Taste has taken us closer than we have ever been to conquering the epistemological gap that separates us. We can measure our distance from the stars; we can measure the differences among ourselves.

When I look back, my life seems to be a series of lucky accidents. I was born late enough to be able to enter science, but early enough to get to work on problems that seemed to be waitingjust for me. Best of all, I had the good fortune to be a psychologist. The difficulties of studying behavior have made us sophisticated about experimental design and statistical analysis. We can study the big picture, but we know how to look beneath the surface to explore underlying mechanisms. The results of our work have impact on the lives of real people (Blakeslee, 1997; Goode, 1999). We have low tolerance for nonsense. To me, it doesn't get any better than this.


REFERENCES

Bartoshuk, L. M. (1991). Sweetness: History, preference, and genetic variability. Pood Technology, 45, 108–113.

Bartoshuk, L. M. (1995). Carl Pfaffmann (1913–1994). American Psychologist, 50, 879–880.

Bartoshuk, L. M., Cunningham, K. E., Dabrila, G. M., Duffy, V B., Etter, L., East, K. R., Lucchina, L. A., Prutkin, J. M., & Synder, D. J. (1999). From

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Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Reviewers for Models of Achievement, Volume 3 ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • References xx
  • Part I - General Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Partners in Progress: Illuminating a New Vision of Women in Psychology 3
  • References 9
  • Part II - Historical and Social Contexts 11
  • Chapter 2 - A Century of Contrasts: Historical and Social Contexts of the 20th Century 13
  • References 24
  • Part III - Autobiographical Perspectives 27
  • Chapter 3 - Frances Mitchell Culbertson 29
  • Representative Publications 43
  • Chapter 4 - Patricia M. Bricklin 45
  • Representative Publications 61
  • Chapter 5 - Frances Degan Horowitz 63
  • References 75
  • Representative Publications 76
  • Chapter 6 - Norine G. Johnson 79
  • References 94
  • Representative Publications 95
  • Chapter 7 - Sandra Wood Scarr 97
  • References 110
  • Representative Publications 111
  • Chapter 8 - Dorothy W. Cantor 113
  • References 123
  • Chapter 9 125
  • References 132
  • Representative Publications 133
  • Chapter 10 135
  • Representative Publications 146
  • Chapter 11 149
  • References 164
  • Representative Publications 165
  • Chapter 12 169
  • References 180
  • Representative Publications 182
  • Chapter 13 185
  • References 197
  • Representative Publications 198
  • Chapter 14 201
  • References 215
  • Representative Publications 217
  • Chapter 15 219
  • References 234
  • Representative Publications 235
  • Chapter 16 239
  • References 253
  • Chapter 17 255
  • References 271
  • Representative Publications 272
  • Chapter 18 275
  • References 287
  • Representative Publications 291
  • Chapter 19 293
  • Representative Publications 303
  • Chapter 20 307
  • Representative Publications 325
  • Chapter 21 329
  • References 339
  • Representative Publications 341
  • Part IV - Achievement Patterns in the 20th Century *
  • Chapter 22 - Profiles and Patterns of Achievement for 53 Eminent Women: Synthesis and Resynthesis 3 343
  • References 419
  • Index 421
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