Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

1997 and serve as its director. Most of the Center projects are created in a multimedia format. Other projects include teaching cross-cultural research ethics through role-playing using a science fiction motif, and how to present academic dishonesty matters in the course syllabus.

It is said that multimedia design is extremely difficult, very specialized, and has a steep learning curve. Not the kind of trick that us “old dogs” could possibly learn. Women are still rarities in this business dominated by very young males who are as comfortable with computers as they are with pulling on their socks. Again, I am so glad that I paid this stereotype no mind. With a large grant from the Fund for Improvement in Postsecondary Education (United States Department of Education), I created an interactive educational program on CD-ROM for first offenders of academic honesty codes. Lisa Gray-Shellberg served as the Companion Site Director at California State University, Dominguez Hills. The program has similarities to assignment by a judge to traffic school for the first speeding ticket. For example, the “F” remains on the plagiarized term paper (as is the fine paid for going 80 in a 35 mph zone). However, something proactive and educational is also offered as an option instead of pressing formal charges (cheating) or reporting a speeding ticket to the insurance company (traffic violation). Everything I love doing was given to this project, including intense collaboration with scores of undergraduate students.

A current parallel project that will extend into my retirement years is a system for teaching very young children values, again using a multimedia, nonlinear paradigm. Fanciful characters symbolize moral principles, temptations, and conflicts. This project is joyful, fun, and very fulfilling. Rag toy figures are involved, which means I have pulled out my old sewing machine that thankfully still works and those scraps of cloth, buttons, feathers, paints, sequins, and other decorative paraphernalia that have been piling up for years because one never knows when such items might come in handy. Watch for a quirky moral fable storyteller named Granny Grit!


REFERENCES

American Psychological Association (1977). Ethical principles of psychologists. Washington, DC: Author.

Keith-Spiegel, E, & Koocher, G. E (1985). Ethics inpsychology. New York: Random House.

Keith-Spiegel, P (1991). The complete guide to graduate school admissions: Psychology and relatedfields. Hillsdale, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Keith-Spiegel, E, & Wiederman, M. (2000). The complete guide to graduate school admissions: Psychology and relatedfields(2nd ed.) Mahwah, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Reviewers for Models of Achievement, Volume 3 ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • References xx
  • Part I - General Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Partners in Progress: Illuminating a New Vision of Women in Psychology 3
  • References 9
  • Part II - Historical and Social Contexts 11
  • Chapter 2 - A Century of Contrasts: Historical and Social Contexts of the 20th Century 13
  • References 24
  • Part III - Autobiographical Perspectives 27
  • Chapter 3 - Frances Mitchell Culbertson 29
  • Representative Publications 43
  • Chapter 4 - Patricia M. Bricklin 45
  • Representative Publications 61
  • Chapter 5 - Frances Degan Horowitz 63
  • References 75
  • Representative Publications 76
  • Chapter 6 - Norine G. Johnson 79
  • References 94
  • Representative Publications 95
  • Chapter 7 - Sandra Wood Scarr 97
  • References 110
  • Representative Publications 111
  • Chapter 8 - Dorothy W. Cantor 113
  • References 123
  • Chapter 9 125
  • References 132
  • Representative Publications 133
  • Chapter 10 135
  • Representative Publications 146
  • Chapter 11 149
  • References 164
  • Representative Publications 165
  • Chapter 12 169
  • References 180
  • Representative Publications 182
  • Chapter 13 185
  • References 197
  • Representative Publications 198
  • Chapter 14 201
  • References 215
  • Representative Publications 217
  • Chapter 15 219
  • References 234
  • Representative Publications 235
  • Chapter 16 239
  • References 253
  • Chapter 17 255
  • References 271
  • Representative Publications 272
  • Chapter 18 275
  • References 287
  • Representative Publications 291
  • Chapter 19 293
  • Representative Publications 303
  • Chapter 20 307
  • Representative Publications 325
  • Chapter 21 329
  • References 339
  • Representative Publications 341
  • Part IV - Achievement Patterns in the 20th Century *
  • Chapter 22 - Profiles and Patterns of Achievement for 53 Eminent Women: Synthesis and Resynthesis 3 343
  • References 419
  • Index 421
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