Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

the contributions of psychology to public policy, gives me the chance to continue my long-standing habit of trying to make the climate that surrounds me more positive. I believe that psychology has much to offer, and I feel obligated to work on projects that seem likely to make a difference.

Over the years, I have been fortunate to work with many wonderful students, at the undergraduate and more often in recent years at the graduate level. At Purdue, the graduate students included Nyla Branscombe, Frances Cherry, Elizabeth Farris, Mary Kite, Laurie Lewis, James Martin, Brenda Major, Arie Nadler, and Janet Taynor. Since coming to the Graduate Center, Yael Bat-Chava, Kathleen Ethier, Barton Poulson, and Anne Reid have earned their degrees with me, and many, many other students have been part of my intellectual life. At the Graduate Center, in particular, the interchange between faculty and students is constant, and a community of scholars takes on real meaning in our day-to-day life.

I've also had the benefit, in more than 30 years as a professor in the field, of seeing some exciting changes in the discipline of psychology. Psychology has grown from a fledgling and tentative discipline to a major contributor of knowledge. For social psychology in particular, the beginning of the 21st century is a period of increased breadth and greater sophistication. What was in the 1960s a rather narrow field, both in methodological preference and in domain of applicability, has now become a discipline more willing to recognize complexity and diversity and more ready and able to use a variety of methodological tools to analyze the issues. For me, social psychology's unique contribution to knowledge is its ability to link the individual to the social context and the broader realm of social representations that shape our understanding. We are now, I believe, closer than ever to meeting the challenge of that goal.

As for lessons that I have learned, I offer only one guideline with absolute certainty: the importance of addressing questions that are meaningful and important to you, whether or not they are intellectually fashionable at the time. It is difficult at best to predict the course of scientific discovery. Rather than attempt to predict where others will go, I have found it far more rewarding to carve out my own path—and often, quite happily, to find others going the same way on a shared intellectual journey.


REFERENCES

Aronson, E., Willerman, B., & Floyd, J. (1966). The effect of a pratfall on increasing Interpersonal attractiveness. Psychonomic Science, 4, 227–228.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Reviewers for Models of Achievement, Volume 3 ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • References xx
  • Part I - General Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Partners in Progress: Illuminating a New Vision of Women in Psychology 3
  • References 9
  • Part II - Historical and Social Contexts 11
  • Chapter 2 - A Century of Contrasts: Historical and Social Contexts of the 20th Century 13
  • References 24
  • Part III - Autobiographical Perspectives 27
  • Chapter 3 - Frances Mitchell Culbertson 29
  • Representative Publications 43
  • Chapter 4 - Patricia M. Bricklin 45
  • Representative Publications 61
  • Chapter 5 - Frances Degan Horowitz 63
  • References 75
  • Representative Publications 76
  • Chapter 6 - Norine G. Johnson 79
  • References 94
  • Representative Publications 95
  • Chapter 7 - Sandra Wood Scarr 97
  • References 110
  • Representative Publications 111
  • Chapter 8 - Dorothy W. Cantor 113
  • References 123
  • Chapter 9 125
  • References 132
  • Representative Publications 133
  • Chapter 10 135
  • Representative Publications 146
  • Chapter 11 149
  • References 164
  • Representative Publications 165
  • Chapter 12 169
  • References 180
  • Representative Publications 182
  • Chapter 13 185
  • References 197
  • Representative Publications 198
  • Chapter 14 201
  • References 215
  • Representative Publications 217
  • Chapter 15 219
  • References 234
  • Representative Publications 235
  • Chapter 16 239
  • References 253
  • Chapter 17 255
  • References 271
  • Representative Publications 272
  • Chapter 18 275
  • References 287
  • Representative Publications 291
  • Chapter 19 293
  • Representative Publications 303
  • Chapter 20 307
  • Representative Publications 325
  • Chapter 21 329
  • References 339
  • Representative Publications 341
  • Part IV - Achievement Patterns in the 20th Century *
  • Chapter 22 - Profiles and Patterns of Achievement for 53 Eminent Women: Synthesis and Resynthesis 3 343
  • References 419
  • Index 421
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 429

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.