Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

with women, but that are in reality often used by effective leaders of either gender. As a woman who brought the legacy of her own socialization to her eventual leadership style, I feel strongly about the need for appreciating diverse ways of working. In an article written for the Educational Record(Albino, 1992), I pointed out that although men and women—and by extrapolation, people of varying ethnic backgrounds—differ as to their levels of comfort with various professional behaviors, research had shown that these differences are not necessarily relevant in terms of overall performance.

As I look back on what is becoming a long and winding career in psychology, I am proud of my successes, but I am just as proud of what some would call failures. I say this because I have never regretted the goals that prompted my choices and actions, and because I have learned from my failures how better to achieve those goals. I believe the real key to success is to pay attention to larger, more enduring values and insure that we have personal mission statements tied to those values. For psychologists, that comes with the territory, for we have always viewed psychology itself as rooted in a fundamental belief in the value of human beings, and in their capacity to grow and to change. For my part, I hope to be helping others to do just that, grow and to change through higher education, for a long, long time.


REFERENCES

Albino, J. E. (1973). Sex differences on factor dimensions related to withdrawing from college. Research in Education(ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 080 926).

Albino, J. E. (1980). Motivating underserved groups to use community dental services. In S. L. Silberman & A. F. Tryon (Eds.), Community dentistry: A problem-oriented approach(pp. 135–154). Littleton, MA: PSG Publishing Co.

Albino, J. E. (1984). Scholarship and dental education: New perspectives for clinical faculty. Journal of Dental Education, 48, 509–513.

Albino, J. E. (1992). Strategy: The dirty word that women must learn. Educational Record, 73(2), 47–51.

Albino, J. E. (1999). Leading and following in higher education. The Psychologist-Manager Journal, (3)1, 27–40.

Albino, J. E., Cunat, J. J., Fox, R. N., Lewis, E. A., Slakter, M. J., & Tedesco, L.A. (1981). Variable discriminating individuals who seek orthodontic treatment. Journal of Dental Research, 60, 1661–1667.

Albino, J. E., & Lawrence, S. D. (1993). Promoting oral health in adolescents. In S. G. Millsteln, A. C. Petersen, & E. O. Nightingale, (Eds.), Promoting the health of adolescents: New directions for the twenty-first century(pp. 249–259). New York: Oxford University Press.

Albino, J. E., Lawrence, S. D., Lopes, C. E., Nash, L. B., & Tedesco, L. A. (1991). Co-operation of adolescents in orthodontic treatment. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 14(1), 53–70.

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