Models of Achievement: Reflections of Eminent Women in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Agnes N. O'Connell | Go to book overview

distorted by virtue of having status and authority. I try to be aware of the power differential that exists in and out of the classroom. So I do my best to treat students and junior colleagues with care, concern and respect and I am attentive to providing support and mentoring.

As an academic leader, I have learned not to wait for others to make needed changes. Consultation is important, but I have tried to be ready to go first and modest enough to acknowledge the others who have assisted or smoothed the way. As a spouse, a daughter, a mother, and a friend, I have found that relationships, both familial and friendships, need as much work and attention as a career. We know what will happen if no attention is paid to a career—it can wither and stagnate. Relationships, too, will suffer from neglect. I do not plan to let such effects impact me; I intend to be an old woman who has family, friends, and memories—not just memories.

So, when asked for advice by my junior colleagues in psychology, I advise them to do careful and strategic research that will be meaningful and that they will be proud of now and in the future. But I also strongly suggest that people pay attention to all parts of their lives. I think it is particularly unwise to consider one's life as “on hold.” So many people say they will pay attention to relationships once they get to graduate school, or once they graduate, or once they get a position and so on. But life does not stay on hold. It will go on whether it is fulfilling or not. So I suggest that one should regularly assess his or her goals and then look to see if his or her choices match priorities; and I try to do the same myself.


REFERENCES

Graham, S. (1992). “Most of the subjects were White and middle-class”: Trends in published research on African Americans in selected APA journals, 1970–1989. American Psychologist, 47(5), 629–639.

Guthrie, R. V (1976). Even the rat was white: A historical view of psychology. New York: Harper & Row.

Reid, PT. (1975). Reinforcement, modeling, maternal attitudes and sex-role preferences in preschool girls. Unpublished manuscript, University of Pennsylvania.

Reid, R T. (1976). Are black children feminized by maternal dominance? In R.C. Granger & J.C. Young (Eds.), Demythologizing the inner city child (pp. 125–130). Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Reid, R T. (1979). Racial stereotyping on television: A comparison of the behavior of both black and white television characters. Journal of Applied Psychology, 64, 465–471.

Reid, R T. (1984). Feminism vs. minority group identity: Not for black women only. Sex Roles, 10, 247–255.

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