Between Couch and Piano: Psychoanalysis, Music, Art and Neuroscience

By Gilbert J. Rose | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Between words and music

Where does aesthetic responsiveness arise? A prototype may well lie in the nonverbal emotional rapport and empathy of the earliest infant-parent interplay. Within this matrix are found, too, the rhythmic sing-song and syllables that universally comprise the rudiments of music and words. Reaching further back, there is the interactional synchrony that neonates manifest within twenty minutes of birth: they react to voices with synchronized movements (cited by Benzon, 2001). And still further, since auditory systems become active three to four months before birth, perhaps the fetus becomes entrained to speech patterns in utero. Little is known about any of this.

We know perhaps even less about the continuum between knowing and feeling. Or words and music. We do know that words and music are both rooted in the body. As Freud (1891) made clear in a number of his writings beginning with On Aphasia, every word has been bathed in sensory sources coming from parental speech and intonation. There is no such thing as a disembodied word.

Emboldened by recent neuroscience, it would seem more apparent than ever that cognition and feeling are basically inseparable and not only in infancy. In the course of development and the attrition of daily life they become more differentiated from each other.

It is a common problem of clinical practice to attempt to rejoin them and thereby help restore a sense of inner and outer wholeness without the danger of flooding. The early discovery of transference, then counter-transference, and now an increased sensitivity to intersubjectivity are among the tools in this direction.

As for words and music, words tend to cluster towards the knowing end of the intellect-feeling spectrum; music towards the opposite pole.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Between Couch and Piano: Psychoanalysis, Music, Art and Neuroscience
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 189

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.