The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922

By Wendy Palace | Go to book overview

6

The Simla Conference and the bipartite settlement, 1912-1914

I hope he [McMahon] will get his rug in the long run, though the discussions have been complicated by the Tibetans having a rug of their own which they also try to sell exorbitantly.

Lord Crewe to Lord Hardinge, May 1914

On 16 March 1912 Yuan Shih Kai became president of a new Chinese Republican government in Peking, ushering in a period of closer co-operation between China and the western powers and increasing the personal power of Sir John Jordan in Peking who, since February 1911 had been doyen of the foreign legations in Peking and who was already known to the new president. 1

Jordan and his colleagues had welcomed Yuan's presidency as a means of easing existing Anglo-Chinese tensions in general, believing that his influence might bring about greater opportunities for talks with China on a number of issues, including the status of Tibet. This initial optimism soon proved unfounded, for the change to Republican government had little effect on China's main Asian policy, which had serious implications for Tibet. Yuan continued to hold onto territories in Mongolia, Sinkiang and Tibet acquired under the Manchu, but the forward policy in Tibet - and more particularly the plan to create Sikang - had not been a Manchu initiative, the main driving force behind this having come from the provincial government of Sichuan. Yuan had many supporters in Sichuan who had been prepared to defy the Manchu in order to implement this policy and who were now anxious to see it carried out when he became president. The resulting dramatic changes in policy, which at first appeared to British eyes to be an unexpected departure, were in reality merely extensions of policies already begun in Sichuan in the dying days of the Manchu dynasty. 2

New Republican policy was most obviously reflected in the 'Five Races Decree' of May 1912. This decree was portrayed as an attempt to enhance the status of peoples, previously regarded under the Manchu as subject races of China, by declaring them Chinese citizens. As one of the five races covered by the decree Tibetans now had the right to some

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - The Younghusband Invasion, 1900-1904 1
  • 2 - Masterly Inactivity 15
  • 3 - Beyond the Frontier 36
  • 4 - Delicate Work 53
  • 5 - Revolution, Invasion and Independence 73
  • 6 - The Simla Conference and the Bipartite Settlement, 1912-1914 92
  • 7 - The China Service and East Tibet, 1914-1918 106
  • 8 - Lhasa Unveiled 126
  • Conclusion 143
  • Notes 150
  • Select Bibliography 180
  • Index 188
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 195

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.