The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922

By Wendy Palace | Go to book overview

Index

a
Abor/expedition 75 -7
Adamson, Sir Harvey 76
Addy, Premen 12
Adhesion Treaty 33 , 35 , 66 ;
impact on Anglo-Chinese relations 35 , 38 - 41 , 43 , 51 , 95 , 97 , 105 , 128 , 143 , 148 ;
signed 29 ;
talks 20 , 26 - 30
Afghanistan 21 , 90
Aglen, Sir Francis 81
Alston, Sir Beilby 97 , 111 , 129 , 132 , 136 , 141
America 119 , 126 , 129 -30, 132 -4, 138 , 141
amban(s) 1 - 2 , 57 , 62 -3, 76 , 93 , 99 , 117
Ampthill, Lord 9
Anglo-Russian Convention 20 -2, 24 -6, 33 , 35 , 71 , 86 , 88 - 90 , 111 , 127 , 130
Anglo-Russian relations 20 , 62 , 66 , 71 , 88 - 90 , 130 , 145 -6
Anglo-Tibetan relations 4 , 15 , 26 , 38 , 52 , 59 , 60 -3, 67 , 87 -8, 110 , 131 , 133 , 136 -7, 141 , 143 , 145 -6, 148 , 149
Anglo-Japanese Alliance 3 , 23 -4, 54 , 127 , 130 -2, 134 -5, 145
Aoki 132
Asia/Asian policy 56 , 68 , 88 , 108 -11, 118 , 126 , 130 -3, 142 -4, 148 -9
Assam 69 - 70 , 73 -6, 79 , 84 , 95 , 104 -5
August Memorandum 95 -6

b
Bailey, Frederick 37 , 45 -6, 48 , 135
Balfour, Sir Arthur 7 , 16 , 27 , 106 , 133
Batang 1 , 53 , 57 , 100 , 114 -16, 118 -22
Bell, Sir Charles 37 , 47 - 50 ;
and Dalai Lama 64 , 67 , 86 , 129 , 137 ;
as P.O. Sikkim 67 , 74 , 82 , 107 , 132 , 139
Bell Mission 128 , 135 -42, 145 , 148
Bell, Mrs 137
Beri 124
Bhutan:
Bhutan Treaty 70 -1;
Chinese interest in 67 , 94 ; 104 -5, 146 ;
Himalayan State of 3 , 10 , 17 , 63 , 65 ;
Tsonga Penlop of, 17 , 29
Bipartite Treaty, 1914 108 , 127 , 132 , 136 -8, 141 , 146
Boer War 7
Bogle, George 4 , 11
Bolsheviks 111
Boundary Pillars 17 , 19 - 20
Boxer Rebellion/Protocol 2 , 11 , 54 -5, 148
British arms to Tibet 132 , 136 -8
British Consul to Kashgar 89
British Foreign Secretary 20 , 54 , 125 , 127 -9, 133 , 143 -4
British Foreign Service 6 , 10 , 21 , 70 , 106 , 140 , 142 -4, 146
British Himalayan policy 63 -4, 67 , 75 , 93
British legation in Peking 15 , 25 , 28 , 40 , 46 , 54 -6, 60 , 76 , 80 , 88 , 102
British Minister(s) to Peking 11 , 44 , 53 -5, 140
British North-Eastern frontier policy 64 , 67 , 70 , 74 -6, 106
British representive to Lhasa 69 , 87 , 103 , 137 , 141 -2
British School, Gyantse 138
British Tibetan policy 46 , 50 , 58 , 63 , 65 -6, 69 - 75 , 77 , 84 , 87 -8, 90 , 96 , 106 , 109 , 111 , 122 , 124 , 126 -30, 138 , 141 -4, 146 -7
British representive to Gyantse 88
British trade agents 10 , 13 - 14 , 16 - 17 , 19 , 47 , 49 , 51 , 79 - 80 , 83 , 104
Bruce, Mr B.D. 98 -9
Buchanan, Sir George 89
Buddhists/Buddhism 3 , 12 , 17 , 23 , 25 , 62 , 68 , 83 , 89 , 110 , 116 , 130 , 144 , 146

-188-

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The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - The Younghusband Invasion, 1900-1904 1
  • 2 - Masterly Inactivity 15
  • 3 - Beyond the Frontier 36
  • 4 - Delicate Work 53
  • 5 - Revolution, Invasion and Independence 73
  • 6 - The Simla Conference and the Bipartite Settlement, 1912-1914 92
  • 7 - The China Service and East Tibet, 1914-1918 106
  • 8 - Lhasa Unveiled 126
  • Conclusion 143
  • Notes 150
  • Select Bibliography 180
  • Index 188
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