Russia: Tsarist and Communist

By Anatole G. Mazour | Go to book overview

27
Russia in World War I (1914-1917)

MEMORANDUM OF DURNOVO

RUSSIA'S PARTICIPATION in a major European conflict was assured, first and foremost, by her adherence to the Triple Entente and secondly by virtue of her being a first-rate Power. The course of action was generally outlined by the chain of events long preceding the Sarajevo episode. For some time a storm had been predicted by those who were not totally blind to diplomatic developments in the Far and Near East or to the gigantic test for world power which was in preparation on the high seas. In the Balkans stood Austria-Hungary and Russia face to face and ready to defend their claims to spheres of influence. Russia's traditional ties to the Balkan nations, motivated by strategic and economic interests and ethnic kinship, came into sharp conflict with an Austria driven southeastward by the multinational nature of her empire and by Germany's 'new course' --the Drang nach Osten. On the eve of the fateful month of June 1914, the shape of things was such as to allow prediction of the line-up of the enemies: the European Continent was virtually cut into two parts by a German-Austro-Hungarian-Bulgarian-Turkish alliance facing a triple front of Britain, France, and Russia.

In their endeavor to explain how Russia came into the war in 1914, many historians cite profusely the diplomatic correspondence, chiefly of Count Benckendorff, former Russian Ambassador to London, of Izvolsky, who held a similar position in Paris, or of Sazonov, the Russian Foreign Minister at the outbreak of the war. The result of this labor is a picture of a country eager to enter the war and therefore largely to blame for provoking the conflict. Yet there is sufficient evidence that many influential men feared the oncoming war and made every endeavor to prevent the nation from participating. There were some who by intuitive compulsion made a desperate appeal to stay out of war. Such was the notorious Rasputin, who by the end of July insisted that 'the war must be stopped --war must not be declared; it will be the end of all things'. There were others, who even earlier than the very eve of the war calculated the dangers which a world conflict might bring to Russia. Foremost among these was the former Minister of the Interior and member of the Council of State, P. N. Durnovo, who as early as in February 1914, troubled by the gathering storm, presented Nicholas II with a lengthy memorandum.

-529-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia: Tsarist and Communist
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1000

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.