Galileo in Rome: The Rise and Fall of a Troublesome Genius

By William R. Shea; Mariano Artigas | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We wish to thank most warmly the Templeton Foundation for providing us with a grant to coordinate our work and carry out research in the archives in Rome and Florence. We are also grateful to Paolo Galluzzi and his staff at the Institute and Museum of the History of Science in Florence, to Monsignor Alejandro Cifres, who has made the Archives of the Holy Office in the Vatican a friendly place to work, and to the officials of the Vatican Library, the Biblioteca di Archeologia e Storia dell'Arte and the Biblioteca Vallinceliana in Rome. We owe special thanks to Lucia Caravale of the Società Dante Alighieri in Rome for making available documents regarding the Palazzo Firenze, where Galileo spent a great part of his time in Rome, and to several others whom we are pleased to mention here: Corrado Calisi of the Biblioteca della Camera dei Deputati, who introduced us to the Galileo Rooms that were formerly part of the convent of Santa Maria sopra Minerva, where Galileo was tried; Irene Trevor of the American Academy in Rome, who graciously allowed us to visit the Casa Rustica, where Cesi's dinner in honour of Galileo took place in 1611; Cosimo di Fazio, who provided information on the Florentine residences of Galileo and enabled us to visit the Convent of San Mateo in Arcetri; Mario Sirignano, of the Accademia dei Lincei who taught us to walk in Galileo's footsteps in Rome; the librarians of the Biblioteca Nazionale and of the Archivio di Stato in Florence; Rafael Martinez of the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross in Rome, who undertook a detailed study of a manuscript on Galileo that contains novel and exciting material that one of us (Mariano) came across in the Archives of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Vatican (formerly the Holy Office). Special

-vii-

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