Empirical Direction in Design and Analysis

By Norman H. Anderson | Go to book overview
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EXERCISES FOR CHAPTER 16
1. In the Oregon admissions procedure, it might be objected that this prediction equation would be unfair to applicants from minority groups. How do you suppose they handled this matter?
2. In relation to Missing Variables Confounding:
a. Why might height have a large b weight for predicting childrens' vocabulary size if age was missing?
b. Do you think one is a better predictor than the other?
c. Do you think one is more causal than the other?
d. * Can effects of age and height be separated?
3. In Mystery of the Missing Cloud Cover in Section 16.2.2, explain:
a. How heavier fighter opposition could cause lower bombing accuracy.
b. How the cloud cover variable could produce the counterintuitive result.
4. The Mystery of the Missing Cloud Cover of Section 16.2.2 shows that a missing variable can have fatal consequences. Experimental studies, of course, typically manipulate only a few variables. Numerous variables are thus missing from the design.
a. In what way are randomized experiments not troubled by missing variables?
b. In what ways are randomized experiments troubled by missing variables? Cite specific experimental illustrations from previous chapters.
5. Under Cognitive Analysis of Clinical Judgment in Section 16.1.3:
a. Justify the statement “If subjects did make conilgural judgments, the additive model should fail to fit them.”
b. * Make up a factorial design using trait adjectives to describe persons and select row and column adjectives that you think will produce configural response, that is, responses that depart in some systematic direction from additivity. Make up and plot hypothetical data.
6. In Taxes and Education (Section 16.2.2):
a. Give two plausible interpretations of the statsig b weight for background variables.
b. What relevance does the statsig b weight for background variables have to the cited interpretation of the nonstatsig b weight for resource variables?
7. One of the three studies on effects of beta carotene (vitamin A) on cancer cited under Personal Health in Section 16.2.2 found a statsig harmful effect.

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