Empirical Direction in Design and Analysis

By Norman H. Anderson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

PREFACE
Everyone recognizes the need to go beyond the significance test, especially to assess size and importance of effects. Unfortunately, most of the popular statistical indexes for assessing size and importance of effects not only fail to illuminate but actually obscure the data. This is not surprising since size and importance usually need to be assessed in empirical, extrastatistical terms. This issue is discussed in Section 18.1 on size and importance and continued in Section 18.3 on curve shape.One useful way to go beyond the significance test is with the mean-plus-confidence interval. Section 18.2 presents this approach to analysis of contrasts designed to test specific effects.Section 18.4 takes up the following seven topics.
1. Concept of Validity. This section relates the discussion of validity begun in Section 1.2 to two major positions, one from test theory, one from quasi-experimental design. Neither position suffices for experimental analysis.
2. Multivariate Analysis of Variance. Multivariate analysis of variance is a needed tool to handle multiple different measures on each subject. For common repeated measures designs, however, ɛ-adjusted Anova is generally preferable.
3. Partial Analysis. Valuable simplification of multi-factor design can be obtained by using extrastatistical knowledge systems to strike out most of the high-way statistical interaction residuals.
4. Pooling. Pooling interaction terms with error is sometimes appropriate when done a priori, but only in exceptional circumstances when done post hoc.
5. Regression Artifact. The ubiquitous, insidious regression artifact needs to be understood by everyone; see especially the Exercises.
6. Multiplication Model for Repeated Measures. With repeated measures variables, transformation of the data has a twofold potential benefit: Transformation can increase the size of the effect and also decrease the error term.
7. General Linear Model. All most of us need to know about the general linear model in 1 ½ easy pages.

-550-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Empirical Direction in Design and Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 864

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.