Empirical Direction in Design and Analysis

By Norman H. Anderson | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

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Achen, C. H. (1986). The statistical analysis of quasi-experiments. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

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Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta Carotene Cancer Prevention Study Group. (1994). The effect of vitamin E and beta carotene on the incidence of lung cancer and other cancers in male smokers. New England Journal of Medicine, 330, 1029–1035.

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Anderson, N. H. (1959b). Test of a model for opinion change. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 59, 371–381.

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Anderson, N. H. (1964a). An evaluation of stimulus sampling theory: Comments on Professor Estes' paper. In A. W. Melton (Ed.), Categories of human learning (pp. 129–144). New York: Academic Press.

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