Diversity and Citizenship Education: Global Perspectives

By James A. Banks | Go to book overview

around the world would cooperate (in various ways, places, and times) to deliberate curriculum possibilities, each of us in our local milieu would have before us, in our array of curriculum alternatives, some that now are plainly lacking: transnationally deliberated curricula. These will be different in interesting ways from those developed locally. At the very least, they should direct curriculum developers' attention to transnational topics and problems. One such attempt involving nine nations on three continents produced a problem-centered curriculum featuring emerging world crises (Parker, Ninomiya, & Cogan, 1999). This was a promising, if limited, effort. Many others are needed if a literature is to be created on which local curriculum workers can draw when developing curricula for local schools. Without this, multicultural and cosmopolitan aims are sure to be compromised by parochial norms and blinders. Any deliberation is strengthened to the extent that diverse social positions and perspectives are present at the table; curriculum deliberation is no exception.


REFERENCES

Anderson, B. (1983). Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism. London: Verso.

Anyon, J. (1997). Ghetto schooling: A political economy of urban educational reform. New York: Teachers College Press.

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Banks, J. A., Cookson, P., Gay, G., Hawley, W. D., Irvine, J. J., Nieto, S., Schofield, J. W., & Stephan, W. G. (2001). Diversity within unity: Essential principles for teaching and learning in a multicultural society. Seattle, WA: Center for Multicultural Education, University of Washington.

Barton, K. C., & Levstik, L. S. (in press). Teaching history for the common good: Theory and research for teaching about the past. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

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Cornbleth, C., & Waugh, D. (1995). The great speckled bird: Multicultural politics and education policymaking. New York: St. Martin's Press.

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