Feeling the Heat: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Climate Change

By Jim Motavalli | Go to book overview

PHOTO ESSAY

Witness to a Warming World

Gary Braasch

Climate change is happening. I have seen it with my own eyes, and I see it right now. I have stood in the empty rookeries of displaced Adelie penguins, and felt a chill from the receding ice of the Antarctic Peninsula. I saw young black spruces growing higher than ever before on boreal hillsides in Alaska, and subtle changes transform the tundra. Near my home in the Pacific Northwest, I watch the slowly melting glaciers, and in the Andes, have rephotographed 65-year-old images of great glaciers to show them wasting away. Along the coasts, I have seen rising tides and heavy storms erode beaches. In the woods of eastern North America, I walked through spring wildflowers and spotted incoming migrant songbirds, knowing them to be arriving disconcertingly early.

I made these and other observations as part of a personal photographic project, “World View of Global Warming.” I wanted to venture beyond the raw statistics, the charts and the predictions. I wanted to create an alternative to the numbers, the arguments over “who's to blame, ” and what palliative measures governments and corporations might be willing to take. I looked instead at the earth itself, with the eyes of a natural history photographer. Global warming and climate change have been set in motion. Ecosystems and species are already reacting. In both remote locations and familiar gardens and parks, scientists are devoting their careers to documenting the effects. This evidence, however, is largely dismissed by the Bush administration and is just beginning to be debated in Congress and by politicians. The visi-

-a1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feeling the Heat: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Climate Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.