Feeling the Heat: Dispatches from the Frontlines of Climate Change

By Jim Motavalli | Go to book overview

ABOUT E MAGAZINE

E/The Environmental Magazine debuted in 1990 while the world was celebrating the twentieth anniversary of Earth Day, yet reeling from a series of environmental shocks, including the Exxon Valdez oil spill, “greenhouse summers, ” fires in Yellowstone Park, and medical waste washing up on America's eastern shores. In the time since, E has established itself as the leading independent environmental journal.

Edited for the general reader but also of sufficient depth to appeal to the dedicated activist, E is a clearinghouse of information, news, commentary, and resources on environmental issues. E was founded and is published by Connecticut residents Doug Moss and Deborah Kamlani, and it is edited by Connecticut resident and long-time writer, author, and radio host Jim Motavalli. E is a project of the not-for-profit Earth Action Network, Inc., which also owns and manages the environmental website http://www.emagazine.com, where an extensive archive of E stories is maintained. E also produces the syndicated question-and-answer column “Earth Talk” that appears weekly in a variety of hometown newspapers around the United States.

E covers everything environmental-from recycling to rainforests, and from the “personal to the political”-and reports on all key and emerging issues, providing extensive contact information so readers can investigate topics further or plug into activist efforts.

E also follows the activities and campaigns of a broad spectrum of environmental organizations, and provides information on a range of lifestyle topics-food, health, travel, “house and home, ” personal

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