Presidents as Candidates: Inside the White House for the Presidential Campaign

By Kathryn Dunn Tenpas | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The many years of research and writing that have created this book have left in their wake a multitude of debts to supportive friends, loving family members, inspirational teachers and helpful colleagues and mentors. The starting point for this book was undoubtedly Georgetown Professor James Lengle, whose enthusiasm for presidential electoral politics prompted me to pursue graduate studies so that I might learn more about the subject. The guidance and generosity of Charles Jones, James Ceaser, Steve Finkel and Larry Sabato expanded my initial interest in campaigns to a broader interest in American institutions. The idea for this book, however, emerged from an impromptu meeting with Charles Jones in a Charlottesville bagelry when he off-handedly mentioned that one area in the literature that had gone relatively unnoticed, despite its important implications for governing, was the notion of presidents as candidates.

From that opening bagel to this book, I received a great deal of support from the University of Virginia, the Bradley Foundation, and the Brookings Institution, where I conducted the bulk of my research. While at Brookings I learned much outside the confines of my office from Bob Katzmann, Kent Weaver, Stephen Hess, Bert Rockman, Tom Mann and Pietro Nivola. Research fellows Matthew Dickinson, Charles Shipan and Forrest Maltzman demonstrated a great deal of patience in helping me think through difficult arguments and issues. Additionally, I am deeply grateful to the many former White House and party staff members who generously gave of their time to speak with me, and also

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Presidents as Candidates: Inside the White House for the Presidential Campaign
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 191

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.