The Costs of Crime and Justice

By Mark A. Cohen | Go to book overview

5

Policy analysis and the costs of crime

As discussed briefly in Chapter 1, there are several reasons why criminal justice policymakers might be interested in quantifying the cost of crime. Thus policymakers might be interested in how crime compares to other social ills or whether the burden of crime on society is increasing or decreasing over time. One of the most important-and most controversial-purposes of placing dollar values on crime is to conduct a benefit-cost analysis.

Since the early 1980s, federal government regulatory agencies have been required to conduct benefit-cost analyses on major regulatory initiatives. These requirements have been adopted through Executive Order and implemented by the Office of Management and Budget. 1 Recent proposals in Congress would legislatively mandate similar requirements. 2 Thus benefit- cost analyses have become a routine tool in the development of environmental, health, and safety regulations. 3 Despite its widespread use elsewhere, benefit-cost analysis has not been a staple of the criminal justice policy analyst's toolkit. This is rapidly changing in response to both increasing public demand for accountability of government agencies and the availability of new data and techniques of analysis for identifying the costs and benefits of criminal justice policies. For example, the U.S. National Institute of Justice recently solicited research proposals in several priority topic areas. Among its priorities were “the studies that develop cost-benefit methods that can be applied to crime prevention or control programs or that assess the cost-effectiveness of specific crime prevention strategies, programs, and technologies” (NIJ, 2004). At the state level, legislatures in Washington, Oregon, Virginia, and others have begun to mandate studies of both “what programs work” and the cost-effectiveness (including weighing the costs and benefits) of criminal justice and crime prevention programs. 4 Ultimately, benefit-cost analyses might be required for newly proposed criminal justice policies.

The existing literature on benefits and costs of criminal justice policies generally takes either one of two forms: “cost-effectiveness” or “benefit-cost” studies. A cost-effectiveness study seeks to answer questions such as “what is the cost per crime averted?” or “what is the cost per successfully treated offender who does not recidivate?” These questions require a thorough

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Costs of Crime and Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figure ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Introduction and Overview 1
  • 2 - An Economic Approach to Crime and Costing Methodologies 16
  • 3 - Victim Costs 41
  • 4 - Third-Party and Society Costs 74
  • 5 - Policy Analysis and the Costs of Crime 90
  • Notes 106
  • References 109
  • Index 119
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 121

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.