The Costs of Crime and Justice

By Mark A. Cohen | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Notes

1

Introduction and overview

1
As discussed in Chapter 2, there are methods that can be adopted to deal with the effect of wage inequality on estimating the cost of crime. In short, the analyst might adopt “average” wage rates in the U.S. in estimating the cost of lost wages. This puts all crime victims on an equal footing-regardless of their wealth.
2
As some critics have noted, all cost estimates are subject to considerable uncertainty and categories of cost will inevitably be left unaccounted for (Zimring and Hawkins, 1995). Thus, unless methods and assumptions are relatively consistent, or the unaccounted costs are known to be relatively small, any such comparisons are likely to be of questionable value.
3
Chapter 5 contains a more detailed discussion of benefit-cost analysis.
4
See Sherman et al. (1997) for a comprehensive examination of the effectiveness of alternative programs.
5
It is also an ex post measure that presumably is higher than the ex ante willingness to pay. We will discuss this further in Chapter 2.

2

An economic approach to crime and costing methodologies

1
French, Rachal, and Hubbard (1991) contains a useful discussion of the distinction between private, social, and external costs.
2
Chapters 8 and 9 of Hellman (1980) provide a useful discussion of the economics of victimless crimes.
3
More specifically, we would want to compare the rate of moving by individuals in a similar demographic group to that of the victim. For example, if retirement-age people tend to move frequently, we would want to compare their background rate of moving to that of retirement-age victims to see if the latter move more frequently.
4
On the other hand, it may not be possible to replicate a small pilot intervention program on a large enough scale to make a significant dent in aggregate crime rates. Replication may not be possible if the success of a program can partly be explained by the high level of commitment and intensity of interest by initial program participants, for example.
5
For illnesses that are essentially acute (i.e. less than one year's duration), incidence- and prevalence-based cost estimates will be roughly the same. Prevalence-based estimates are substantially higher for serious injuries (Miller and Luchter, 1988).
6
The concept of “present value” is fundamental to economics and is relatively easy to understand. A dollar today is worth more than a dollar tomorrow in purchasing power owing to inflation. Similarly, a dollar next year is worth less than

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Costs of Crime and Justice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 121

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?