10

Case material

We have seen that the labour migrant with whom the book began was not setting off alone on the journey to town. Labour migrants, peasants, women, industrial workers, schoolchildren-all are actors in the great social changes which are occurring in the Third World. At times they may seem powerless in the face of these changes. But they are all involved, in a multiplicity of groups, as individuals, as producers and consumers, as refugees and guerilla fighters, as poets and as musicians, through culture and through labour, in the construction of their development and their future. Inevitably, their development and their future is also our own, for the world has, in the past five hundred years, become one system of political, economic and cultural relations.

In this chapter I am going to review some of the topics mentioned in earlier chapters, looking at different aspects, as well as introducing some fresh material. A selection of readings, linked by some comments and questions, should help you to think more deeply about some of the issues. I have chosen these readings in order to provide both some 'hard' statistical information and some 'flavour' of the Third World. We begin with some basic geography.


Where is the Third World?

The map opposite has been marked with national boundaries. Each country has a number. Using the list of countries in chapter 2 (pages 33-34) as a starting point, try to identify the country which goes with each number. Then answer the questions at the top of page 194.

-192-

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Sociology and Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vi
  • Part One - Introduction and Overview 1
  • 1 - Feeling the Effects of Development 3
  • 2 - Development Theory: the Light of Experience 33
  • Part Two - Town and Countryside 51
  • 3 - Urbanisation and Urbanism 53
  • 4 - Industrialisation 73
  • 5 - Rural Development: Entering the Market 95
  • 6 - Rural Development and Social Differentiation 112
  • 7 - State, Government and Education 130
  • 8 - Gender and Development 148
  • Part Three - Themes in the Sociology of Development 171
  • 9 - Defining and Measuring Development 173
  • 10 - Case Material 192
  • Glossary 219
  • Bibliography 225
  • Index 229
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