Glossary
The purpose of this glossary is to explain the special meanings of the words printed in bold in the text. These explanations are not intended to be exhaustive, they are meant to enable you to read some of the more difficult parts more easily. There would be no point in learning them as definitions as many of them are the subject of extensive discussion and debate.For more detailed explanations, you could consult The Social Science Encydopaedia by A. and J. Kuper, or The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought (Fontana, 1986).
Alienation

Derived from the work of Marx (and others), it describes the experience of people in capitalist society, their feeling that they have no control over their fate, play no part in social life beyond giving obedience to an employer or to the law, and have no control over the products of their labour because these do not belong to them but to the owners of capital.

Anomie

The social condition in which dominant beliefs are questioned or repudiated. As a result, individuals are confused as to correct ways of behaving. Durkheim noted that such a state of affairs could develop in times of either extreme social and economic decline or of prosperity. Related, but different from, the idea of alienation (q.v.).

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Sociology and Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vi
  • Part One - Introduction and Overview 1
  • 1 - Feeling the Effects of Development 3
  • 2 - Development Theory: the Light of Experience 33
  • Part Two - Town and Countryside 51
  • 3 - Urbanisation and Urbanism 53
  • 4 - Industrialisation 73
  • 5 - Rural Development: Entering the Market 95
  • 6 - Rural Development and Social Differentiation 112
  • 7 - State, Government and Education 130
  • 8 - Gender and Development 148
  • Part Three - Themes in the Sociology of Development 171
  • 9 - Defining and Measuring Development 173
  • 10 - Case Material 192
  • Glossary 219
  • Bibliography 225
  • Index 229
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