Visual Perception: An Introduction

By Nicholas J. Wade; Michael T. Swanston | Go to book overview

Preface to first edition

Vision is our dominant sense. We derive most of our information about the world-about where things are, how they move, and what they are-from the light that enters the eyes and the processing in the brain that follows. These functions are performed by all sighted animals, including ourselves, and yet we still do not understand how. Vision is also the sense about which we know the most, because of the vast amount of empirical research that has been undertaken over the years. This large body of knowledge is celebrated in most of the textbooks that have been written on visual perception; indeed, it can act as a shroud that obscures the purpose of vision from many of those who study it. We feel that textbooks tend to focus too closely on the plethora of phenomena of vision rather than on its function: They frequently reduce vision to a series of headings such as brightness, colour, shape, movement, depth, illusions, and so forth, while remaining blind to the uses to which it is put. We have tried to redress the balance a little in this book The principal focus is the function that vision serves for an active observer in a three-dimensional environment-we must be able to see where objects are if we are going to behave with respect to them. Thus the perception of location, motion, and object recognition provides the core to the book, and our intention is to make the ideas involved in their study accessible to the reader with no background in psychology. With this in mind we decided deliberately to avoid citing references in the text. This strategy might prove trying for the instructor, but it is hoped that it has the effect of making the book more readable. If it is necessary to qualify every minor point regarding the experimental base of a scientific discipline then it can not be very securely founded. Another feature we have tried to stress is the historical context in which our present studies are conducted. The history of the study of vision is as long as that of science itself, and many forces have fashioned the conceptual framework in which it operates today-our ideas have been shaped by art, optics, biology, and philosophy as well as by psychology. We need to appreciate these influences if we are to learn from, and avoid repeating, errors from the past.

The other framework that has structured this book is that of three-dimensional space: All our behaviour takes place with respect to it, and since behaviour is guided by perception it is logical that they share the same

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Visual Perception: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to First Edition ix
  • Preface to Second Edition xi
  • 1 - Understanding Visual Perception 1
  • 2 - The Heritage 32
  • 3 - Light and the Eye 85
  • 4 - Location 143
  • 5 - Motion 178
  • 6 - Recognition 215
  • 7 - Representations and Vision 236
  • 8 - Summary and Conclusions 259
  • References 267
  • Name Index 277
  • Subject Index 281
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.