Rome and the Western Greeks, 350 BC-AD 200: Conquest and Acculturation in Southern Italy

By Kathryn Lomas | Go to book overview

Preface

Studies of Magna Graecia and its constituent cities have multiplied rapidly over the past twenty years. The vast amount of excavation in the region has greatly increased the evidence at our disposal, and surveys have added immeasurably to our understanding of the economy and society of southern Italy. Despite this, it is a region which remains relatively little known in the English-speaking world. In particular, the later history of Magna Graecia-the Hellenistic and Roman periods-have not received the attention they deserve, despite posing some fascinating historical problems.

This book originated as a Ph.D. thesis for the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, which aimed to explore selected problems connected with the Roman conquest of the South and the post-conquest processes of assimilation. In the evolution from thesis into book, I have widened the scope of the discussion in order to place some of the more specific issues into a broader context, and to consider the conquest of the South as a case study of Roman treatment of a particular region. Given the enormous range of archaeological material now at our disposal, this cannot hope to be a complete synthesis of all available data, but I hope that it will contribute to the debate on the history of Magna Graecia.

I would like to thank the British School at Rome for its generous support of the doctoral research project on which this book is based. I would also like to thank the supervisor of the original thesis, Mr J.J. Paterson, and also Dr T.J. Cornell, Prof. M.H. Crawford, Prof. J.G.F. Powell, Prof. B.B. Sheftopn and Dr A.J.S. Spawforth for their help and advice at various stages of preparation.

Plate 1 appears by permission of the Greek Museum, University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and Plates 6-12 by courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum. All other maps and photographs are the author's own.

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rome and the Western Greeks, 350 BC-AD 200: Conquest and Acculturation in Southern Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.