Reading Epic: An Introduction to the Ancient Narratives

By Peter Toohey | Go to book overview

7

VIRGIL, AENEID

Discussion to this point has followed closely the unfolding of the stories within each of the epics. In the next two chapters I intend to abandon sequential paraphrase and to pursue an analysis that is based on themes. Why? There are many interpretative paraphrases of the Aeneid (particularly Quinn 1968 and Williams 1980a, 1980b). It would, perhaps, be pointless to repeat labours better done by others. As for the Metamorphoses, it poses a different problem. Ovid's narrative is labyrinthine, yet it is not hard to follow (Glenn 1986 offers an interpretative paraphrase). What is needed is not paraphrase (which easily becomes as labyrinthine as the narrative itself), but to show how Ovid's 250 odd stories encrypt a limited number of themes and concerns.


LOVE, WAR, AND THE AFTERLIFE OF THEAENEID

Love and war-the tension between them has conditioned the afterlife of Virgil's Aeneid. Dido or Aeneas, the lover or the general, they represent the two poles between which 2,000 years of readers have swung. The audience has swung more to Dido than to Aeneas. And if the poem lives it may be because of her: there are, for example, almost one hundred operas based upon her romance with Aeneas (Heinrichs 1991). Even Chaucer told her story-not once, but twice (in The House of Fame and in the Legend of Good Women). Chaucer preferred Dido to Aeneas. Aeneas has had no such privileged post-mortem existence.

Yet war and its resolution have attractions. This (crystallized in the duel between Aeneas and Turnus concluding the epic) has guaranteed the epic a firm place in European sentiment. For hun

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading Epic: An Introduction to the Ancient Narratives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.