Antony and Cleopatra: New Critical Essays

By Sara Munson Deats | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is the result of many years of reading about and teaching Antony and Cleopatra. Many individuals and institutions have contributed to the completion of this study and I would like to acknowledge at least some of them at this time.

First and foremost, my gratitude to my thirteen contributors for their innovative and inspirational essays o'erflows the measure. I am confident that these original essays, written especially for this anthology, through the variety of their subject matter and the diversity of their critical approaches, will significantly expand the critical contexts within which this vast and wonderful drama can be read, viewed, and analyzed.

I would also like to express my appreciation to the Chairperson of my Department, Phillip Sipiora, who offered continual support, both psychological and financial, for this project. In addition, I would like to thank the Sabbatical Committee at the University of South Florida, which granted me the research time absolutely necessary for the completion of this endeavor, and the USF Publications Council, which contributed funds to support this project. David Fuller also would like to acknowledge substantial financial support from the British Academy in carrying out the archival research for his essay.

I also am grateful to all of the librarians, curators, and theater personnel who graciously and tirelessly assisted me in finding necessary research material and illustrations for this collection. These include the library staff of the University of South Florida; Kathleen Coleman of the Harvard Theatre Collection; Janet Birkett of the London Theatre Museum; Audrey Hall of the National Museums of Liverpool; Stacy Bemento of the Philadelphia Museum of Art; Sylvia Morris, Marian Pringle, Susan Brock, and Helen Hargest of the Shakespeare Centre Library in Stratford-upon-Avon; Martin Durrant of the

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