New Directions in the History of Nursing: International Perspectives

By Barbara Mortimer; Susan McGann | Go to book overview

6

US organized medicine's perspective of nursing

Review of the Journal of the American Medical Association, 1883-1935

Brigid Lusk and Julie Fisher Robertson

Nursing and medicine are inexorably intertwined, through a shared interest in patient welfare. This professional proximity has encouraged members of both groups to observe and respond to the activities of the other. Following the introduction of formal nurse preparation in the US during the 1870s, there is evidence that physicians welcomed the presence of educated nurses at their side. The early records of the Illinois Training School for Nurses cite several instances of physician approbation of trained nursing care. For example, in 1882 a Cook County surgeon wrote:

A week ago, standing by the bedside of a little boy, a victim of that dread disease hydrophobia, I could not help admiring the tender care which rendered his last hours more bearable. No mother could have done half so much for her own child as this nurse did for her charge, and in the face of risking her own life by so doing. 1

Yet later physicians wrote scathingly of the education of nurses and their perceived encroachment upon medical practice. For example, a 1928 editorial in the Illinois Medical Journal discussed the 'presumptuous, physician-dominating, over-trained, dictatorial nurses and their mock practice of medicine'. 2

In this chapter, we examine and analyse the development of this attitudinal change through nursing-related literature that appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) from 1883 to 1935. This time period was pivotal for the development of both professions. A description of the changing fortunes of nursing and medicine is included to provide necessary contextual information. While medicine was transforming itself into a scientific profession, nursing-conceived as a respectable new field for women-struggled with inferior training schools and limited career prospects. Historical data show that nursing was significantly shaped by the paternalistic dominance of medicine, with its overpowering forces of gender and social class. 3

JAMA first appeared as the weekly publication of the American Medical Association (AMA) in July 1883. It was modelled on the successful British Medical Journal, which had produced positive benefits for the British Medical Association in terms of membership and revenues. 4 The new journal was a success. In 1875,

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Directions in the History of Nursing: International Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 207

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.