The Communist Movement in the Arab World

By Tareq Y. Ismael | Go to book overview

Appendix 6

“The Social Revolution and the East”*

M. Sultan-Galiev

The social revolution in Russia is only a beginning, one of the stages of the worldwide international social revolution. Sooner or later, it must take the form of revolutionary strife, of a desperate and decisive skirmish between two irreconcilable enemies, two opposing and contradictory forces, the international proletariat and international imperialism. The frontiers and territory springing at the moment from the civil war within the boundaries of the former Russian monarchy must expand and become intensified, both in their internal maintenance and in their external manifestations. Gradually, with the development of the revolution, entire peoples and countries will be drawn and must be drawn beyond their own wars, into this war, which appears on the whole to be the last human butchery on the earth's globe. This is inevitable and unavoidable. The old world has already become much too decrepit. It is groaning and falling to the ground. It is cracking in all its rotten joints! All the earth, all its atoms, thirst for and demand renovation, demand that they be transposed to an entirely new harmony. And the decisive moment has come, not only for separate human individuals, but also for entire peoples and governments, as cultural-historical variants, when each of them must define his fate and irrevocably decide on which side of the barrier to place himself. Whether you want to or not, you must take part in it, and consciously or unconsciously, become either “white” or “red.”

That this is so we see as a matter of fact. The October revolution had still not occurred, when labor and capital in Russia, the proletariat and the bourgeoisie, as two forces hostile to one another, had already begun to differentiate themselves, had begun to define themselves and to prepare for a decisive struggle with one another.

The October revolution was only a moment of collision between these forces in Russia, when the Russian bourgeoisie beaten on the head in its homeland, was compelled to transfer the concentration of the remainder of its forces to the outskirts of Russia and to the countries of the Entente,

* Translated from Zhiz' Natsional nostei (no. 38 (46), October 5, 1919; no. 39 (47), October 12, 1919; no. 42 (50) November 2, 1919) by Carly Rogers.

-180-

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