Long-Term Environmental Effects of Offshore Oil and Gas Development

By Donald F. Boesch; Nancy N. Rabalais | Go to book overview

The number of individual hydrocarbon components which enter the marine environment as a result of spills is quite large. The chemical composition of crude oils is complex and varies among different producing regions and even within a formation. A summary of the chemical composition of hydrocarbon sources is provided by the National Research Council (1985). Specific examples related to fates and effects of these hydrocarbons are provided in greater detail in Chapters 5, 6, 7, and 8.


LITERATURE CITED
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