English Literature at the Close of the Middle Ages

By E. K. Chambers | Go to book overview

INDEX
Aberdeen, 131, 159, 183; plays in, 9, 17-18, 20, 64.
Aberdeenshire, 146, 149, 163, 167-68, 182, 226.
Abingdon, 72, 140.
Abraham and Isaac plays, 216-17; Chester, 24, 26-7; Dublin and Brome Manor, 43; Norwich, 43-4; Norwich or Northampton, 43; York, 30.
Abraham and Melchisedek play: Chester, 24.
Abyngdon, Henry, 100.
Acta Pilati, 20.
Adam: Vita Adae et Evae, 20; Anglo- Norman play of, 11, 26, 209. See also Creation, Eve.
Adam and Eve play: York, 30, 32, 209.
Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough, and William of Cloudesly, 157-9, 162-3.
'Adam lay i-bowndyn', 91.
Adam of Usk, 123.
Addelsey, John, 202;
Addison, Joseph, 143.
Adoration of the Cross, 4, 6, 105.
Adso of Toul: de Antichristo, 20.
Adulteress plays: Chester, 24, 26; York, 30.
Aelis, 67-8, 184, 219.
Aelred of Rievaulx, 9.
Agincourt, Battle of, 89, 94-5, 117, 123, 223.
Aiglentine, 184.
Alane, Riche, 139.
Alexander the Great, King, 73, 116; King Alisaunder, 75.
Alfred, King, 72.
All Hallows' Eve, 84.
All Saints' Day, 84, 87.
Allegory, in moralities, 50-1.
Alliteration, 25, 31-2, 37, 93, 126, 129, 190.
'Als i me rode this endre day', 77.
Alysoun, 78.
Amelot, 184.
America, North: ballads from, 146, 149, 227.
Amorous poems, 118-21.
Anglo-Norman plays, 11-12, 26.
Anglo-Saxon: chronicle, 84; epics, 154; lays, 122.
Annunciation carols, 87.
Annunciation plays: Chester, 24, 26-7; Coventry, 41; York, 30.
Antichrist plays, 20, 22, 24, 26.
Antiphon, 2.
Antwerp, 97, 120, 134.
Appalachian mountains: ballads from, 146, 149, 227.
Appleby, John, 201-2.
Armstrong, John, 181.
Arneway, John, 24.
Arnold, Richard, 120.
Arthur, King, 66, 73, 75-6; Morte Darthur, see Malory, Sir Thomas.
Arthur and Merlin, 75.
Ascension plays: Chester, 24; Coventry, 42; York, 30.
Ashwell, Thomas, 99-100.
Asinarium festum, see Feast of Fools.
Assentio, 8.
Assumption plays: absent from Chester cycle, 22-3; at Coventry, 42; in Ludus Coventriae, 48; at York, 30-2.
Athelstan, King, 73.
Aubrey, John, 140.
Audivi, 84.
Augsburg: monks of, 9,
Aureate language, 42-4, 46, 48, 61, 115- 16.
Ave Maria (Wyclifite), 85.
Awdelay, John, 86, 88, 92-5, 100, 103, 106, 114, 221.
Axholme, Lines., 201, 204.
Babwell, Suffolk, 45.
Bagford, John, 142.
Balaam and Balak play: Chester, 24, 26.
Balaam's Ass play: Chester, 24, 26-7.
Balades, 138.
Bale, John, 199.
Ballads, 90, 131-84, 224-9; authorship, 140-1, 165; broadsides, 138-43, 224; Celtic, 172; chronology, 151-7, 159, 163-6, 168, 182; clerical criticism, 141; collections, 142-7, 167, 182; definitions, 144-5, 147-8, 153-4, 172-3; derivation and early uses of term, 137-8; domestic, 168; explicits, 164, 166, 172; historical, 159-63, 166- 8; imaginative, 167-9, 183; incipits, 157-8, 163-4, 166, 168, 172; metre, &c., 149-51; minstrelsy, 158, 160, 162, 164, 166, 168, 172, 176; music, 163; oral transmission, 179-80; origins, 174-9, 181-4; printed, 138; refrains, 149-51, 155, 157, 165; religious, 151-3, 169; Scandinavian, 145, 155, 183-4, 229; Scottish, 144, 166-72, 174, 181-3, 225-7; sexual, 169-70; sophistication of texts, 144; style, 173-4; sung, 139-40, 143, 178, 182-3; sung or spoken, 148; supernatural,

-233-

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English Literature at the Close of the Middle Ages
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford History of English Literature i
  • The Oxford History of English Literature ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Editors' Note v
  • Contents vi
  • I Medieval Drama 1
  • II The Carol and Fifteenth-Century Lyric 66
  • III Popular Narrative Poetry and the Ballad 122
  • IV Malory 185
  • Bibliography 206
  • Index 233
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