A Political and Economic Dictionary of Eastern Europe

By Alan J. Day; Roger East et al. | Go to book overview

O

Oder-Neisse line

The border between eastern Germany and Poland formed from the Oder-Neisse river system and extending from the Baltic Sea to the Czech Republic. In the closing stages of the Second World War, as the Allied Powers debated the future make-up of a post-Nazi Europe, the reconstruction of Poland, and therefore also of Germany, became of central importance. Poland was liberated by Soviet forces that went on to occupy Berlin in 1945, putting the Soviet Union in a commanding position in negotiations over Poland's future. Since the country was losing substantial eastern territories to the Soviet Union itself, the new communist authorities in Poland pressed for territory in the west at the expense of defeated Germany. The Soviet leadership consequently proposed the course of the lower Oder river, and its tributary the Neisse, as a natural frontier, pushing the new Poland far into historically German lands. Initially the idea was opposed by the Western allies, seeking to limit the consequent population movements and national upheaval for Germany However, the presence of Soviet troops on the ground, and the desire of the Western leaders to be accommodating towards Stalin on this issue, led the Allies to agree to the Oder-Neisse proposal in the Yalta and Potsdam Agreements. Millions of Germans were forcibly deported from the annexed territory.

The post-1945 borders were recognized by the newly-established East German state in 1950. West Germany, however, continued to regard them as no more than a temporary administrative border until 1971, when a change in stance on policy towards the East was marked by recognition of the enduring status of the Oder-Neisse line. At the time of German reunification in 1990, the Federal Republic of Germany moved quickly to attest the legitimacy of the Oder-Neisse line as Poland's inviolable western border. This was confirmed in the German-Polish Treaty signed in Warsaw on 14 November 1990.


ODSsee Civic Democratic Party.

OEsee Country of Law Party.

-417-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Political and Economic Dictionary of Eastern Europe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 642

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.