Rogues, Thieves, and the Rule of Law: The Problem of Law Enforcement in North-East England, 1718-1800

By Gwenda Morgan; Peter Rushton | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1.
The Guardian, 12 March 1997.
2.
G. Pearson, Hooligan. A history of respectable fears (London: Macmillan, 1983).
3.
Michael Meranze, Laboratories of virtue. Punishment, revolution and authority in Philadelphia, 1760-1835 (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1996), pp. 1, 3.
4.
L. Radzinowicz, A history of English criminal law and its administration from 1750 (London: Stevens, 1948-68), vol. 1 for details of these laws.
5.
J.H. Baker, “The refinement of English criminal jurisprudence, 1500-1848”, in Crime and criminal justice in Europe and Canada, L.A. Knafla (ed.) (Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfred Laurier University Press, 1981), pp. 24-5; T.A. Green, Verdict according to conscience. Perspectives on the English trial jury, 1200-1800 (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1985); J.H. Langbein, “The criminal trial before the lawyers”, University of Chicago Law Review 45, 1978, pp. 263-316.
6.
See N. Walker, Crime and insanity in England. vol. 1: the historical perspective (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1968), p. 68; and M. Gaskill, “The displacement of Providence. Policing and prosecution in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England”, Continuity and Change 11, 1996, pp. 341-74; trial of William Winter and company, Newcastle Courant 6044, 11 August 1792.
7.
P. Corrigan & D. Sayer, The great arch. English state formation as cultural revolution (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1985); see J.R. Kent, “The centre and the localities: state formation and parish government in England circa 1640-1740”, Historical Journal 30, 1995, pp. 363-404.
8.
R.Jütte, Poverty and deviance in early modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994); B. Bushaway, By rite. Custom, ceremony and community in England, 1700-1800 (London: Junction Books, 1982); E.P. Thompson, Whigs and hunters. The origin of the Black Act (London: Allen Lane, 1975), and Customs in common (London: Penguin, 1993); and A. Wood, “The place of custom in plebeian political culture: England 1550-1800”, Social History 22, 1997, pp. 46-60.
9.
J.H. Langbein, “Albion's fatal flaws”, Past and Present 98, 1983, pp. 96-120.
10.
A. Smith, Lectures on jurisprudence, R.L. Meek et al. (eds) (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982), p. 208; D. Hume, A treatise on human nature, P.H. Nidditch (ed.) (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978), p. 579.

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Rogues, Thieves, and the Rule of Law: The Problem of Law Enforcement in North-East England, 1718-1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Glossary ix
  • List of Tables xi
  • List of Illustrations xii
  • North-East England xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Character of North-East England 9
  • Chapter Two - Enforcing the Law 27
  • Chapter Three - The Patterns of Crimes and Punishments 47
  • Chapter Four - The Social Organization of Crime 77
  • Chapter Five - Common and Unnatural Crimes: Women and North-East Crime 97
  • Chapter Six - Learning Their Lesson: the Use of Public Punishments 125
  • Chapter Seven - Transportation 153
  • Chapter Eight - Correction and Imprisonment 171
  • Chapter Nine - Law and Disorder 191
  • Conclusion 215
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 261
  • Index 277
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