Hearts and Minds: Self-Esteem and the Schooling of Girls

By Jane Kenway; Sue Willis | Go to book overview

Conclusion

Jane Kenway and Sue Willis

After consideration of the girls, schooling and self-esteem discourse from a range of different perspectives, what is an apt way to conclude such a discussion? Indeed, are conclusions appropriate after such a journey through so many related but different fields? A common tendency in the conclusions which often follow collections of this kind is for the editors or authors to offer 'ways forward'. These sometimes take the form of rather patronizing 'tips for teachers'. Such attempts often rush towards closure and/or solutions, then falter in the process, dispensing ill-conceived suggestions for practice which not only fail to do justice to both the preceding material and the complexity of education, but also close off the broad array of possible responses which the collection might otherwise have generated. We feel no such compulsion towards closure. Indeed, as the collection's introduction and the chapter by Peter Renshaw (Chapter 1) suggest, the unseemly haste with which educational research has been translated into policy and then into practice for schools, is a particular problem of this field. Renshaw makes very clear the confusion and ambiguity which constitute the area of self-esteem research and, along with the chapters in Part II, points to the dangers of making assumptions about the connection between high self-esteem and high achievement and between low self-esteem and low social status (matters we will return to). Basing policy and practice upon a research literature which suffers such confusion is problematic to say the least.

As we indicated at the outset, our purpose in taking a closer look at this literature was threefold: first, to identify some of its problems, omissions and underlying messages; second, to address some of the more neglected issues; and third, to generate some possible alternative readings. Generally, our intention has been to enhance the field, not to discredit it. As is the case in the development of most knowledge, however, it is often difficult to achieve the former without at least something of the

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hearts and Minds: Self-Esteem and the Schooling of Girls
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.