Teacher Talk: A Post-Formal Inquiry into Educational Change

By Raymond A. Horn Jr. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter Two

A Post-Formal Inquiry

Critical reflection on my experience indicates that teachers are central to effective change. Their position in the hierarchy of education creates leverage opportunities in dealing with other stakeholders (specifically parents, students, and administrators). However, long-term change fails to occur for the following reasons: education is locked into a modernistic paradigm that is inappropriate for the postmodern problems education faces; teachers lack the power, skills, and knowledge to effect substantial change; and established professional development strategies perpetuate the two previously mentioned conditions.

These conclusions led to further questions. What understanding of change would career high school teachers who have shared the same change initiative construct? Through post-formal conversation, can teachers acquire the skills and knowledge that will inform their awareness and understanding of educational change? Can teachers become empowered through this post-formal process? Finally, is this post-formal process an appropriate professional development model for the postmodern condition?

Answering these questions necessitates an understanding of how career teachers view the change attempts in which they have participated. People other than teachers usually generate the countless theories and speculations concerning educational change. If teachers are central to an understanding of change, then an investigation is required into the interpretations and meanings that teachers construct about the change they experience.

My investigation has taken the form of a post-formal inquiry. One of the multiple purposes of Teacher Talk is to explicate and explore the potential of post-formal inquiry as an investigative and professional development model. An essential element of post-formal inquiry is the consideration of power. Power is seen as a ubiquitous entity that affects all meaning-making. This ubiquity of power leads to the premise that change

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teacher Talk: A Post-Formal Inquiry into Educational Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 189

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.