Teacher Talk: A Post-Formal Inquiry into Educational Change

By Raymond A. Horn Jr. | Go to book overview

Appendix A

Debriefing
One of the techniques that is supposed to enhance the accuracy or trustworthiness of what I report is called member checking. The way it works is that I give you the opportunity to critique what I write that relates to what you may have said, what you may have inferred, or my interpretation of what I think you said. The following are things to which I would like you to react. If you prefer to write a response, tape record a response, or meet and tell me your response, any of these is okay with me.
1. First, in my report I should be using pseudonyms for each of you. What name would you prefer to be called?
2. Initially I told you that any information that I had (such as my research proposal, books, and so on) you could use. I make note of this:

Ironically, the participants made no requests for this information. At one point Sue expressed a desire to learn more about the effects of postmodernism on education, and I responded by providing her with Andy Hargreaves' book (1994). Besides this, the participants did not request any other information. My speculation is that this lack of interest was a reflection of their distrust of theory. I sensed that they valued the interaction of their own interpretations more than any theory that I could provide. The affective component of their remembrances undoubtedly reinforced the veracity of these memories and the new meanings constructed by this analysis of their past and present experience. Often the inability of theory to invoke emotion is to the detriment of the believability of the theory.

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Teacher Talk: A Post-Formal Inquiry into Educational Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Teacher Talk - A Post-Formal Inquiry into Educational Change *
  • Dedication *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction *
  • Chapter One - The Failure of Educational Change *
  • Chapter Two - A Post-Formal Inquiry *
  • Chapter Three - Education in Crisis: the Postmodern Context *
  • Chapter Four - A New Direction *
  • Chapter Five - Teacher Talk: Post-Formal Stories *
  • References *
  • Appendix A *
  • Appendix B *
  • Appendix C *
  • Appendix D *
  • Appendix E *
  • Index *
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