The History of Science and Religion in the Western Tradition: An Encyclopedia

By Gary B. Ferngren; Edward J. Larson et al. | Go to book overview

THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND RELIGION IN THE WESTERN TRADITION: AN ENCYCLOPEDIA

GARY B.FERNGREN

General Editor

Professor of History
Oregon State University
Corvallis, Oregon

Edward J. Larson

Co-editor

Richard B. Russell Professor
of History and Law
University of Georgia
Athens, Georgia

Darrel W. Amundsen

Co-editor

Professor of Classics
Western Washington University
Bellingham, Washington

Anne-Marie E. Nakhla

Assistant Editor

Independent Scholar
Seattle, Washington

GARLAND PUBLISHING, INC.

A MEMBER OF THE TAYLOR & FRANCIS GROUP

NEW YORK & LONDON

2000

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of Science and Religion in the Western Tradition: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Part I - The Relationship of Science and Religion 1
  • 1 - The Historiography of Science and Religion 3
  • 2 - The Conflict of Science and Religion 12
  • Bibliography 16
  • 3 - The Demarcation of Science and Religion 17
  • 4 - Epistemology 24
  • 5 - Causation 31
  • 6 - Views of Nature 38
  • 7 - God, Nature, and Science 45
  • 8 - Varieties of Providentialism 53
  • Bibliography 57
  • 9 - Natural Theology 58
  • 10 - The Design Argument 65
  • Bibliography 67
  • 11 - Miracles 68
  • Bibliography 73
  • 12 - Theodicy 74
  • 13 - Genesis and Science 76
  • 14 - Nineteenth-Century Biblical Criticism 79
  • Part II - Biographical Studies 83
  • 15 - Galileo Galilei 85
  • 16 - Blaise Pascal 90
  • 17 - Isaac Newton 95
  • 18 - Charles Darwin 100
  • Part III - Intellectual Foundations and Philosophical Backgrounds 107
  • 19 - Plato and Platonism 109
  • Bibliography 114
  • 20 - Aristotle and Aristotelianism 115
  • Bibliography 121
  • 21 - Atomism 122
  • Bibliography 127
  • 22 - Epicureanism 128
  • 23 - Stoicism 132
  • 24 - Augustine of Hippo 134
  • 25 - Thomas Aquinas and Thomism 137
  • 26 - Skepticism 141
  • 27 - Cartesianism 146
  • 28 - Mechanical Philosophy 149
  • 29 - The Cambridge Platonists 155
  • 30 - Deism 158
  • Bibliography 160
  • 31 - The Enlightenment 161
  • 32 - Baconianism 169
  • 33 - German Nature Philosophy 172
  • 34 - Materialism 176
  • 35 - Atheism 182
  • 36 - Positivism 189
  • Bibliography 194
  • 37 - Pragmatism 195
  • 38 - Evolutionary Ethics 199
  • 39 - Scientific Naturalism 201
  • 40 - Secular Humanism 208
  • Bibliography 213
  • 41 - Process Philosophy and Theology 214
  • Bibliography 219
  • 42 - The Social Construction of Science 220
  • 43 - Gender 223
  • 44 - Postmodernism 231
  • Part IV - Specific Religious Traditions and Chronological Periods 235
  • 45 - Judaism to 1700 237
  • 46 - Early Christian Attitudes Toward Nature 243
  • 47 - Islam 248
  • 48 - Medieval Science and Religion 259
  • 49 - Orthodoxy 268
  • 50 - Roman Catholicism Since Trent 274
  • 51 - Early-Modern Protestantism 281
  • 52 - Judaism Since 1700 288
  • 53 - Modern American Mainline Protestantism 291
  • 54 - Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism 298
  • 55 - America's Innovative Nineteenth-Century Religions 307
  • 56 - Creationism Since 1859 313
  • Part V - Astronomy and Cosmology 321
  • 57 - The Calendar 323
  • 58 - Comets and Meteors 326
  • Bibliography 328
  • 59 - Pre-Copernican Astronomy 329
  • 60 - The Copernican Revolution 334
  • 61 - The Eternity of the World 340
  • 62 - The Plurality of Worlds and Extraterrestrial Life 342
  • 63 - Macrocosm/Microcosm 344
  • 64 - Cosmogonies from 1700 to 1900 350
  • Bibliography 355
  • 65 - Geocentricity 356
  • 66 - Flat-Earthism 359
  • 67 - Twentieth-Century Cosmologies 362
  • 68 - The Anthropic Principle 366
  • Bibliography 368
  • Part VI - The Physical Sciences 369
  • 69 - Physics 371
  • 70 - Chemistry 378
  • Bibliography 383
  • 71 - Electricity 384
  • 72 - Chaos Theory 387
  • Part VII - The Earth Sciences 389
  • 73 - Theories of the Earth and Its Age Before Darwin 391
  • Bibliography 396
  • 74 - The Genesis Flood 397
  • 75 - Geology and Paleontology from 1700 to 1900 401
  • Bibliography 408
  • 76 - Uniformitarianism and Actualism 409
  • Bibliography 413
  • 77 - Geography 414
  • 78 - Earthquakes 420
  • 79 - Meteorology 424
  • 80 - Ecology and the Environment 429
  • Part VIII - The Biological Sciences 435
  • 81 - Natural History 437
  • Bibliography 443
  • 82 - The Great Chain of Being 444
  • 83 - Taxonomy 447
  • 84 - The Origin and Unity of the Human Race 452
  • 85 - Evolution 458
  • 86 - Anatomy and Physiology to 1700 466
  • 87 - Premodern Theories of Generation 472
  • 88 - Genetics 479
  • 89 - Eugenics 481
  • Part IX - Medicine and Psychology 483
  • 90 - Medicine 485
  • 91 - Epidemic Diseases 491
  • 92 - European Psychology 495
  • 93 - Psychology in America 502
  • 94 - Theories of Religious Insanity in America 508
  • 95 - Phrenology 513
  • 96 - Theories of the Soul 516
  • Part X - The Occult Sciences 525
  • 97 - Astrology 527
  • Bibliography 532
  • 98 - Magic and the Occult 533
  • Bibliography 540
  • 99 - Alchemy 541
  • Bibliography 546
  • 100 - Hermeticism 547
  • 101 - Numbers 550
  • 102 - The Cabala 553
  • Bibliography 555
  • 103 - Spiritualism 556
  • Bibliography 558
  • Index 559
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 587

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.