Handbook of Health Psychology

By Andrew Baum; Tracey A. Revenson et al. | Go to book overview

to change health-related behaviors. A fourth, related, characteristic contributing to the importance of self-efficacy is its specificity. As the vignette at the opening of this chapter illustrated, the specificity of self-efficacy perceptions enables manageable intermediate goals to be established, further enhancing its utility to interveners. Finally, although its specificity mitigates against a single, universally accepted measure of self-efficacy, researchers and practitioners have found it relatively easy to devise methods of assessing the construct in ways that appear satisfactory.

Despite its clear utility, self-efficacy should not be expected to do everything. The proportion of variance in health behavior not explained by self-efficacy will often be considerable. Although the effects of some other constructs in health psychology on health behavior will be mediated by self- efficacy, others will not. Suggestions that self-efficacy fully captures the effects of outcome expectations, for example, seem forced. Broadening the definition of self-efficacy to subsume other constructs seems to contradict its inherent specificity, one of its most attractive features. These issues notwithstanding, self-efficacy remains a concept that will continue to find widespread utility in health psychology.


REFERENCES

Bandura, A. (1977a). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review, 84, 191–215. Bandura, A. (1977b).

Prentice-Hall. Bandura, A. (1986). Socialfoundations of thought and action: A social cognitive approach. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Bandura, A. (1992). Exercise of personal agency through the self-efficacy mechanism, In R. Schwarzer (Ed.), Self-eficacy: Thought control of action (pp. 3–38). Washington, DC: Hemisphere.

Bandura, A. (1995a). On rectifying conceptual ecumenism. In J. E. Maddux (Ed.), self-eficacy, Theory, research, and application (pp. 347–375). New York: Plenum.

Bandura, A. (1995b). Self-efficacy in changing societies. USA: Cambridge University Press. Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: Freeman.

Barone, D. F., Maddux, J. E., & Snyder, C. R. (1997). Social cognitive psychology. New York: Plenum.

Benight, C. C., Antoni, M. H., Kilboum, K., Ironson, G., Kumar, M. A., Fletcher, M. A., Redwine, L., Baum, A., & Schneiderman, N. (1997). Coping self-efficacy buffers psychological and physiological disturbances in HIV-infected men following a natural disaster. Health Psychology,

Ewart, C. K. (1995). Self-efficacy and recovery from heart attack: Implications for a social cognitive analysis of exercise and emotion. In J. E. Maddux (Ed.), Self-eficacy, adaptation, and adjustment: Theory, research and application (pp. 203–226). New York: Plenum.

Hambleton, R. K., Swaminathan, H., &Rogers, H, J. (1991). Fundamentals of item response theory. Newbury adaptation, and adjustment: Theory, Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: adaptation, and adjustment: Thought control and 16, 248–255.

Blascovich, J., & Tomaka, J. (1991). Measures of self-esteem. In J. R. Robinson, P. R. Shaver, & L. S. Wrightsman (Eds.), Measures of personality and social psychological attitudes (pp. I 15–160). San Diego: Academic Press.

DeVellis, R. F. (1991). Scale development: Theory and applications. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

DiClemente, C. C., Fairhurst, S. K., & Piotrowski, N. A. (1995). Self-efficacy and addictive behaviors. In J. E. Maddux (Ed.), Self-efficacy, adaptation, and adjustment: Theory, research and application (pp. 109–141). New York: Plenum.

Ewart, C. K. (1991). Social action theory for a public health psychology. American Psychologist, 46, 931–944. Park, CA: Sage.

Lazarus, R. S., & Folkman, S. (1984). Stress, appraisal, and coping. New York: Springer.

Lorig, K., & Gonzalez, V. (1992). The integration of theory with practice: A 12-year case study. Health Education Quarterly, 19, 355–368.

Maddux, J. E. (1995). Self-efficacy, adaptation, and adjustment: Theory, research and application. New York: Plenum. Maddux, J. E., Brawley, L., & Boykin, A. (1995). Self-efficacy and healthy behavior: Prevention, promotion, and detection. In J. E. Maddux (Ed.), Self-eficacy, research and application (pp. 173–202). New York: Plenum.

Maddux, J. E., & Meier, L. J. (1995). Self-efficacy and depression. In J. E. Maddux (Ed.), Self-efficacy, adaptation, and adjustment: Theory, research and application (pp. 143–169). New York: Plenum.

Maibach, E., & Murphy, D. A. (1995). Self-efficacy in health promotion research and practice: Conceptualization and measurement. Health Education Research, 10, 37–50.

Miller, S. M., & Diefenbach, M. A. (1998). The Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) Model: A theoretical framework for research in behavioral oncology. In D. S. Krantz & A. Baum (Eds.), Technology and methods in behavioral medicine (pp. 219–244). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Montano, D. E., Kasprzyk, D., & Taplin, S. H. (1997). The theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior. In K. Glanz, F. M. Lewis, & B. K. Rimer (Eds.), Health behavior and health education: Theory, research, andpractice (pp. 85–112). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Nunnally, J. C., & Bernstein, I. H. (1994). Psychometric theory (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

O'Leary, A. (1985). Self-efficacy and health. British Research in Therapy, 23, 437–451. O'Leary, A., & Brown, S. (1995). Self-efficacy and the physiological stress response. In J. E. Maddux (Ed.), Self- efficacy, adaptation, and adjustment: Theory, research and application (pp. 227–246). New York: Plenum.

Rotter, J. B. (1954). Social learning theory and clinical psychology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Schwarzer, R. (1992). Self-efficacy in the adoption and maintenance of health behaviors: Theoretical approaches and a new model. In R. Schwarzer (Ed.), Self-efficacy: action (pp. 217–243). Washington, DC: Hemisphere.

Schwarzer, R., & Fuchs, R. (1995). Changing risk behaviors and adopting health behaviors: The role of self-efficacy. In A Bandura (Ed.), Self-efficacy in changing societies (pp. 259–288). USA: Cambridge University Press.

Strecher, V., DeVellis, B., Becker, M., & Rosenstock, R. (1986). The role of self-efficacy in achieving health behavior change. Health Education Quarterly, 13, 73–92.

Strecher, V., & Rosenstock, R. (1997). The Health Belief Model. In K. Glanz, F. M. Lewis, & B. K. Rimer (Eds.) Health behavior and health education: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 41–59). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Symbaluk, D. G., Heth, C. D., Cameron, J., & Pierce, W. D. (1997). Social modeling, monetary incentives, and pain endurance: The role of self-efficacy and pain perception. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23, 258–269.

-246-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Health Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 962

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.