You Have a Point There: A Guide to Punctuation and Its Allies

By Eric Partridge | Go to book overview

Appendix II

A BRIEF LIST OF ACCENTS

over a vowel indicates that it is long. Technically known as macron.

over a vowel indicates that it is short. Technically known as breve. (As macron=makron, neuter of the Greek adjective makros, long, so breve=breve, neuter of the Latin adjective brevis, short.)

indicates that the vowel is sometimes long, sometimes short.

indicates an acute accent, as in blasé

French accents.

indicates a grave * accent, as in breve

indicates a circumflex accent, as in fête; in a French word an omitted s is implied. But this accent is also used by phoneticians to indicate certain sounds. In Ancient Greek, the accent or or, later, placed over long vowels, indicated a compound tone-a rising falling tone.

' the cedilla, under c, before a or o or u, indicates in French that it is pronounced as s, as in façade.

the umlaut or the umlaut sign, as in German ä, ö, ü, denotes a vowel resulting from umlaut, assimilation of one vowel by a succeeding vowel (Müller=Mueller, Göring=Goering). In English and French, ¨ shows that the second of two sequent vowels is to be pronounced, as in Boötes and coöperative, and it is then named the diaeresis or, by some Americans, dieresis.

the tilde, belongs to Spanish and Portuguese; in the former it indicates a palatal nasal sound, as in cañon, anglicized as canyon, and in the latter that a tilde-surmounted vowel is pronounced nasally, as in João.

over c especially, but also over s and r, shows that č is pronounced tch, as in Čapek (tchapek). This Slavic, especially Czech, accent

aspirates the consonant. It is sometimes called 'a wing'. through a vowel, or over one, indicates, in Scandinavian languages, a sort of umlaut (compare the already mentioned ¨); the former accent occurs, for instance, in the Danish place-names Birkered and Kobenhavn (Copenhagen), and at least one printer calls it 'a bar-o'. The accent in å is, in colloquial reference by Danes, called 'a volle', literally a little round cake; å is also known as 'a Swedish-or, a Norwegian-a'.

In prosody, a stressed syllable is indicated by either an acute accent,

* In Italian a grave accent, as in facoltà, denotes that the syllable (-tà) is stressed.

† I owe much of the information about č, ø and å to Professor Clark.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
You Have a Point There: A Guide to Punctuation and Its Allies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.