Theory and Practice of Distance Education

By Börje Holmberg | Go to book overview

INDEX

a
academic socialization 15, 42, 182
access structure 98, 103
administration 133-45
advance organizers 35, 59-60
affective domain 15, 41-2, 80
American Center for the Study of Distance Education 209
application of distance education 203
appraisal of distance education 206
aptitude-treatment interaction 75, 87
assessment 184-6
assignments for submission 6, 116, 122-7, 151
Association of European Correspondence Schools 11, 210
attitude change 15-16, 42, 80
audio recordings (tape, cassettes) 6, 14, 79-82, 86, 102, 116, 127, 153, 202
Australian and South Pacific External Studies Association 3, 11
Ausubel's cognitive theory 32-3, 159-60
automation 16
autonomy (cf. independence) 105, 165, 167-72, 181, 182

b
Bååth's analysis of educational models 158-9
behaviourism 24, 158
broadcasts (cf. radio, television) 81

c
Centre National d'Enseignement a Distance 12
children 146-9
classes 162, 205
cognitive structures 33, 53, 60
coherence formation 88
combinations of distance and facet-to-face tutoring 152-3
Comenius 21
communication frequency 123-5
completion 196-201
computer 6, 12, 14, 16, 82-4, 117-22, 131, 141
computer conferencing 118-19
concept of distance education 2-3, 181-2
constituent elements of distance education 2, 6
contract learning 73, 169, 186
control 169
conversation theory 53-5
conversational approach (style) 16, 46-55, 173, 182
corporate planning 27
correspondence 105, 131
correspondence education 3, 5, 154, 161
cost 151-2, 201-5
counselling 128-32
course evaluation 184 ff.

-243-

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