Edmund Spenser, the Critical Heritage

By R. M.Cummings | Go to book overview

14.

John Florio

1591

John Florio (1553?-1625), after serving as tutor in modern languages to the son of the Bishop of Durham, entered the Southampton circle in London. The passage printed below, though admittedly tendentious, is illuminatingly alien in its bias.

From Florios Second Frutes (1591), The Epistle Dedicatorie, sigs. A3-A3v:

The maiden-head of my industrie I yeelded to a noble Mecenas (renoumed Lecester) the honour of England, whom though like Hector euery miscreant Mirmidon dare strik being dead, yet sing Homer or Virgil, write frend or foe, of Troy, or Troyes issue, that Hector must have his desert, the General of his Prince, the Paragon of his Peeres, the watchman of our peace,

Non so se migliorDuce o Caualliero. [Triumphus Fame i. 99]

as Petrarke hath in his triumph of fame; and to conclude, the supporter of his friends, the terror of his foes, the Britton Patron of the Muses.

Dardanias light, and Troyans faithfulst hope. [cf. Aeneid VI. 875-7]

But nor I, nor this place may halfe suffice for his praise, which the sweetest singer of all our westerne shepheards hath so exquisitely depainted, that as Achilles by Alexander was counted happy for hauing such a rare emblazoner of his magnanimitie, as the Meonian Poete; so I account him thrice-fortunate in hauing such a herauld of his vertues as Spenser; Curteous Lord, Curteous Spenser, I knowe not which hath perchast more fame, either he in deseruing so well of so famous a scholler, or so famour a scholler in being so thankfull without hope of requitall to so famous a Lord.

-72-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Edmund Spenser, the Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.