Edmund Spenser, the Critical Heritage

By R. M.Cummings | Go to book overview

THE PERIOD 1600-1660

(See Introduction pp. 10-18)


43.

William Camden

1600, 1605

William Camden (1551-1623) after a rather irregular undergraduate career at Oxford, where he knew both Carew and Sidney, moved to London and as a teacher at Westminster School began the antiquarian work which was to make him famous. See also No. 168.

(a) From. Britannia (1600), p. 379:

Here we should mention the chief of English poets, Geoffrey Chaucer, and the one who came nearest him of English poets in happiness of genius and the rich vein of poetry-Edmund Spenser. 1

(b) From Certaine Poems, …and Epitaphs of the English Nation in former Times appended to Remaines concerning Britaine (1605), p. 8:

These may suffice for some Poeticall descriptions of our auncient Poets, if I would come to our time, what a world could I present to you out of Sir Philipp Sidney, Ed. Spencer, Samuel Daniel, Hugh Holland, Ben: Iohnson, Th. Campion, Mich. Drayton, George Chapman, Iohn Marston, William Shakespeare, & other most pregnant witts of these our times, whom succeeding ages may iustly admire.

1Quique minime tacendus Poetarum Anglorum princeps Galfredus Chaucer; & qui ad illum ingenij faelicitate, & diuite Poeseos vena proxime accessit Edm. Spencerus.

-114-

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