Edmund Spenser, the Critical Heritage

By R. M.Cummings | Go to book overview

145.

Richard Carew

1602

See headnote to No. 28.

From The Suruey of Cornwall (1602), fol. 57:

…which termes [dialect words of Cornwall and Devon], as they expresse our meaning more directly, so they want but another Spencer, to make them passable.

-291-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Edmund Spenser, the Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • General Editor's Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xviii
  • I - Introduction 1
  • The Period 1579-1600 35
  • 2. - 1580-90 43
  • 3. - 1580-93 49
  • 4. - 1586 56
  • 5. - 1589-96 60
  • 7. - 1590 63
  • 8. - 1590 64
  • 9. - 1590 65
  • 11. - 1590 68
  • 12. - 1590 69
  • 13. - 1590 70
  • 14. - 1591 72
  • 15. - 1591, C. 1600 73
  • 18. - 1593-1627 78
  • 19. - 1593, 1596 82
  • 22. - 1595 85
  • 23. - 1595 86
  • 24. - 1595, 1605 88
  • 25. - 1596 89
  • 26. - 1597-C. 1610 91
  • 27. - 1598 94
  • 28. - 1595, 1598 95
  • 29. - 1598 96
  • Obituary Verse 100
  • 33. - 1600 102
  • 34. - C. 1600 104
  • 35. - 1600 105
  • 36. - C. 1600 106
  • 37. - 1600 107
  • 38. - After 1600 108
  • 39. - 1601 109
  • 42. - 1606 113
  • The Period 1600-1660 114
  • 44. - 1601 115
  • 47. - C. 1605 118
  • 48. - 1606 119
  • 49. - 1607 122
  • 50. - 1607 123
  • 51. - 1610 124
  • 52. - 1610 125
  • 53. - 1612 126
  • 54. - 1613 127
  • 55. - 1614 128
  • 56. - 1614 129
  • 57. - 1614 130
  • 58. - 1614 131
  • 59. - 1615 132
  • 60. - 1616 133
  • 61. - 1616, 1619 135
  • 63. - 1617, 1621 138
  • 67. - 1621 144
  • 68. - 1621 145
  • 76. - 1632 165
  • 77. - 1633 166
  • 79. - C. 1633 170
  • 81. - 1641 174
  • 82. - 1642-64 175
  • 83. - 1646 178
  • 84. - 1646-55 180
  • 85. - 1648 183
  • 86. - 1648 184
  • 87. - 1650, 1668 185
  • 88. - 1650 187
  • 89. - 1651 189
  • 90. - 1653 190
  • 91. - C. 1654 191
  • 92. - 1655 192
  • 93. - 1656 193
  • 94. - 1658 194
  • 96. - 1668 198
  • 97. - 1669 199
  • 98. - C. 1670 200
  • 99. - 1670 201
  • 100. - 1672-1700 202
  • 103. - 1679 208
  • 106. - 1682 212
  • 107. - 1683 213
  • 108. - 1684 214
  • 109. - 1685 215
  • 110. - 1687 216
  • 111. - 1689 221
  • 112. - 1690 222
  • 113. - 1691 223
  • 114. - 1694-1712 224
  • 115. - 1695, 1716 226
  • 118. - 1698-1717 229
  • 123. - 1704 234
  • 124. - 1704?, 1713 235
  • 125. - 1706, C. 1708 237
  • 127. - 1710, 1712 239
  • 129. - 1713 246
  • 130. - 1713 247
  • 131. - 1715 248
  • Language and Style 277
  • 133. - C. 1583 280
  • 134. - 1588 281
  • 135. - 1593 282
  • 136. - 1594 283
  • 137. - 1596 284
  • 140. - 1598 286
  • 141. - 1598 287
  • 142. - 1598 288
  • 143. - 1599 289
  • 144. - 1600 290
  • 145. - 1602 291
  • 146. - C. 1618 292
  • 147. - 1621 293
  • 148. - 1640 294
  • 149. - C. 1650 295
  • 150. - 1653 296
  • 151. - 1669, 1689 297
  • 153. - 1675 299
  • 154. - 1681 300
  • 155. - 1685-97 301
  • 158. - 1694 304
  • 161. - 1699 309
  • 162. - 1700 310
  • 165. - 1709 312
  • 167. - 1713 314
  • 169. - 1633 317
  • 170. - Before 1639 319
  • 171. - 1662 320
  • 172. - Up to 1697 322
  • 176. - 1684 330
  • 177. - 1694 331
  • 178. - 1715 334
  • Addendum 342
  • Bibliography 344
  • Select Index 347
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.