Wine and the Vine: An Historical Geography of Viticulture and the Wine Trade

By Tim Unwin | Go to book overview

LIST OF FIGURES
1 Cartoon by Blachon 2
2 Cartoon by Barbe 11
3 Pommard and Beaune from the Côte de Beaune 16
4 Pinhão at the junction of the rivers Douro and Pinhão 20
5 Robert Mondavi winery, Oakville, Napa Valley 23
6 The global distribution of viticulture 35
7 The composition of a grape 36
8 The life cycle of Phylloxera vitifoliae41
9 The traditional method of treading grapes: the vintage at Quinta da Foz, Pinhão, northern Portugal 51
10 The construction of a modern winery, with stainless steel fermentation tanks, Cave des Hautes Côtes, Beaune 52
11 The origins and spread of viticulture in south-west Asia and the eastern Mediterranean 65
12 Relief from royal palace at Nineveh illustrating Ashurbanipal and his queen drinking under a bower of vines 67
13 Vintage scene depicted on the walls of the tomb of Khaemwese (Thebes No. 261) c. 1450 BC 70
14 Vintage scenes from Dynastic Egypt 72
15 Banquet scene from the tomb of Nebamun (Thebes) c. 1450 BC 74
16 Carved image of a Hittite god at Ivriz 76
17 Statue of Bacchus with a personification of the vine (AD 150-200) 88
18 Roman statue of Priapus (first-second century AD) 92
19 Red Figure Kylix (480 BC) depicting wine drinking 100
20 The spread of viticulture in Gaul 114
21 Roman wine amphorae 121
22 The distribution of Dressel 1 amphorae in Europe and the western Mediterranean 122
23 A Roman bar at Ercolano (Herculaneum) (AD 79) 125
24 Marble relief illustrating the transport of wine by ox caft 130
25 Vintage scene from the roof of the Church of Santa Costanza, Rome 143

-xi-

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