Learning to Teach English in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience

By Jon Davison; Jane Dowson | Go to book overview

imposed. English as a subject continued to be regarded as central to the politics of education. Opposing models of English continued, and continue, to create tensions for educationists and policy-makers. It would appear that for much of the latter half of the 1980s the government sought to 'turn back the clock' in order to produce an English curriculum founded upon notions of correctness, standard English and formal grammar, which culminated in the proposals for the Revised Orders for English (DES and WO 1993). Chapter 3 discusses the development of the National Curriculum from the publication of the 1995 Orders.


FURTHER READING
Eagleton, T. (1983) Literary Theory, Oxford: Blackwell. Eagleton's book provides a comprehensive overview of literary theory. Chapter 1, 'The rise of English', charts in detail the development of approaches to English literature that influenced the ways in which the subject has come to be taught in school.
Black, P. et al. (1992) Education: Putting the Record Straight, Stafford: Network Educational Press. This collection of papers is written by many of the educationists who were at the heart of the development of the National Curriculum. It is a highly critical insider's view of the political machinations which influenced the development of education in this country in the 1980s and 1990s.
Cox, B. (1995) The Battle for the National Curriculum, London: Hodder & Stoughton. This book gives an account of the implementation of the 1990 National Curriculum for English and the process by which it was replaced by the 1995 English in the National Curriculum. Although it pulls no punches in describing the political interference and shortcomings of the new Order, it recognises positive aspects in relation to the limits of the 1989 Curriculum. Brian Cox suggests a way forward, rather than simply a nostalgic view of the current situation.
LATE (1996) The Real Cost of SATs: A Report for the London Association for the Teaching of English, London: LATE. This report looks at the financial and educational costs of SATs, based on a questionnaire sent to schools after the 1995 tests. It reveals the amount of money and the cost of teaching time, workload and strain, and common objections such as the prevention of providing a broad and balanced English curriculum, inaccurate results, inappropriate means of testing the content of the National Curriculum, teacher morale, and standards of achievement.
National Oracy Project (1991) Teaching Talking and Learning at Key Stage 3, London: NCC/NOP.
National Oracy Project (1993) Teaching Talking and Learning at Key Stage 4, London: NCC/NOP.

Together with the NOP's reports on Key Stages 1 and 2, these publications contain accounts of good practice within the English classroom, particularly in relation to equal opportunities, gender and bilingualism.

National Writing Project (1993) Responding to and Assessing Writing, London: Nelson. This report considers key strategies for developing opportunities for a range of responses to pupil writing in the classroom.
Richmond, J. (1992) 'Unstable materials: the LINC story', English and Media Magazine, spring, English and Media Centre/NATE. John Richmond was joint leader of the North London Language Consortium, one of the consortia of LEAs which conducted the work of the LINC project. His article describes in detail the conflict between the government and those working on the project.

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Learning to Teach English in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Introduction to the Series xv
  • Introduction to the Second Edition xvii
  • Introduction to the First Edition xix
  • 1 - Which English? 1
  • 2 - Battles for English 18
  • Further Reading 37
  • 3 - Working with the National Curriculum 38
  • 4 - The National Literacy Strategy 63
  • 5 - Speaking and Listening 87
  • 6 - Reading 109
  • 7 - Writing 134
  • 8 - Teaching Language and Grammar 155
  • 9 - New(Ish) Literacies: Media and Ict 169
  • References 198
  • 10 - Drama 199
  • Further Reading 219
  • 11 - Approaching Shakespeare 220
  • 12 - Possibilities with Poetry 238
  • 13 - Teaching English At 262
  • 14 - Teaching English: Critical Practice 284
  • Bibliography 298
  • Index 307
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 321

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.