Learning to Teach English in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience

By Jon Davison; Jane Dowson | Go to book overview

8

Teaching Language and Grammar
Elspeth and Richard Bain
INTRODUCTION
Language is a key part of our identity as human beings, expressing both our individuality and our sense of belonging to a group. This is as true of school pupils as it is of adults. Young people are immersed in language during their waking hours. They use it to establish relationships, to understand and interpret their environment and to interact with the world around them. In the English classroom pupils experience language in three different ways:
1 Learning through language. Language is the medium through which much of their learning will take place. Pupils will learn by listening to the teacher and to each other. They will learn by reading written or media texts as well as comments from their teacher or from each other. They will explore and develop their ideas in both speech and writing.
2 Learning to use language. Pupils learn to use language by practising it in a variety of different ways. They practise speaking and writing many different types of text for a range of purposes and to a variety of audiences. They practise reading and listening for many different purposes and in many different contexts.
3 Learning about language. Pre-school children already know a tremendous amount about language at an implicit level. In every conversation they make sophisticated choices of vocabulary, grammar, emphasis and register in order to achieve the tone and effect they want. At primary school they will have received a good deal of explicit language teaching. The task of the secondary English teacher is to build on this existing implicit and explicit knowledge and to help them reflect on language use-their own and other people's-in order to develop the confidence and subtlety of their own use of language.

In most schools the content of lessons on knowledge about language and grammar will follow the framework for English teaching at KS3 and the requirements of the GCSE

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Learning to Teach English in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Introduction to the Series xv
  • Introduction to the Second Edition xvii
  • Introduction to the First Edition xix
  • 1 - Which English? 1
  • 2 - Battles for English 18
  • Further Reading 37
  • 3 - Working with the National Curriculum 38
  • 4 - The National Literacy Strategy 63
  • 5 - Speaking and Listening 87
  • 6 - Reading 109
  • 7 - Writing 134
  • 8 - Teaching Language and Grammar 155
  • 9 - New(Ish) Literacies: Media and Ict 169
  • References 198
  • 10 - Drama 199
  • Further Reading 219
  • 11 - Approaching Shakespeare 220
  • 12 - Possibilities with Poetry 238
  • 13 - Teaching English At 262
  • 14 - Teaching English: Critical Practice 284
  • Bibliography 298
  • Index 307
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