A Linguistic History of English Poetry

By Richard Bradford | Go to book overview

Glossary
binary oppositions A basic analytical tool of linguistics and structuralism. Founded on the assumption that language is a differential structure of signs and that the most basic distinction is binary (e.g. good-bad, right-wrong, yes-no, etc.); and extended as a method of analysing the way in which texts, ideologies and modes of perceptions are structured. See chapter 6, pp. 189-91.
blank verse The iambic pentameter without rhyme. The basic verse form of sixteenth-seventeeth-century drama (see chapter 2, pp. 31-40 on 'Shakespeare'), which became an accepted non-dramatic form only after Milton's precedent in Paradise Lost (see chapter 3, pp. 76-85).
cognitive-conventional The cognitive dimension of language refers to our most fundamental level of comprehension (a.k.a. linguistic competence). The term can only be properly understood in relation to its opposing conventional dimension. For example, when we read and understand the statement, 'I am Richard', we generally focus upon its signifying structure as pronoun, verb and name (cognitive) but if a statement has a prominent rhythmic pattern, uses rhyme or alliteration, or is divided typographically into distinct lines, we are also obliged to take into account its conventional structure, i.e. those elements that are self-evidently poetic. See S.R. Levin's 'The Conventions of Poetry' (1971), and Chapter 1, pp. 15-16.

See also the 'double pattern' and the 'sliding scale'.

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Linguistic History of English Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor's Introduction to the Interface Series viii
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - Theory 1
  • 2 - Shakespeare and the Metaphysicals 31
  • 3 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century 66
  • 4 - Romanticism 97
  • 5 - Victorian Poetry 133
  • 6 - Modernism and Criticism 154
  • Appendix 200
  • Glossary 204
  • Bibliography 216
  • Index 222
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 225

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.