Participatory Evaluation in Education: Studies in Evaluation Use and Organizational Learning

By J. Bradley Cousins; Lorna M. Earl | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

The Many Modes of Participatory Evaluation

Michael Huberman


Introduction

For a good fifty years, the educational research and evaluation community has tried to find procedures that have local legitimacy, technical robustness, and the capacity to move a 'client' public along a recommended trajectory. No one has succeeded cleanly, but several communities, including the community represented in this set of papers, are still at it. It is, in fact, a tall order. How to provide crucial evaluative information unequivocally? How to make certain that this information is understood and actually used in sensible ways? How to marshal this data in order to consolidate or reorient the implementation of new measures?

Some of the answers are contained in two cognate fields: evaluation utilization and knowledge utilization. Alkin (1991) has reviewed some of the key variables in the evaluation field, such as the quality of the evaluation, its local credibility, its relevance, the means and amount of communication about the evaluation results, the agreement between findings and expectations, and the timeliness of the findings. In the knowledge utilization field, Huberman (1993) has homed in on 'dissemination competence', and 'quality of dissemination products'. The first set includes targeted products, interpersonal modes of disseminating information, follow-up, multiple channels of dissemination and reinforcement of users. The quality of dissemination products category includes a focus on malleable or 'alterable' factors, the contextualization of findings and the operationalization of key findings. These factors then determine whether users will invest time and resources in the data and whether they will act on the information, even if it differs from their own assumptions.

As it happens, these two communities-evaluators and dissemination specialists-have come together, conceptually speaking. For example, many of the variables just mentioned are identical or reconcilable. There has not, however, been as much feverish work on two of the directions taken here. First, the objective in each of the forgoing chapters has been to achieve some measure of 'organizational learning'. This is a slippery measure, and I am one of several who is wary of it.

The guiding-and plausible-premise behind organizational learning is that knowledge is socially constructed, and that these social symbol systems can become salient and operative in a given organization. Changes in understanding, perceptions and interpretations are then indicators of shifts in reflective frameworks. These changes, logically enough, occur more frequently when there is a dense interpersonal network

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Participatory Evaluation in Education: Studies in Evaluation Use and Organizational Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 192

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.