School Effectiveness for Whom? Challenges to the School Effectiveness and School Improvement Movements

By Roger Slee; Gaby Weiner et al. | Go to book overview
its techniques to test policy prescriptions. Much of the work in this area has been undertaken in Scotland (see e.g. Gray, Mcpherson and Raffe, 1982; Willms and Mcpherson, 1997), New Zealand (Lauder et al., 1995; Harker and Nash, 1996; Hughes et al, 1996 and 1997) and the United States albeit often from a neo-liberal perspective (see e.g. Chubb and Moe, 1990). Research within this tradition is better understood as examples of a revamped political arithmetic (Brown et al., 1997) designed to bring to account official claims about government policy.
3
To give an example, in a study conducted by Lauder and Hughes (1990) one of the least performing schools in their sample-once intake and contextual variables had been taken into account-was a single-sex girls school with an apparently high socio-economic intake. However, this result is almost certainly misleading since the majority of high SES (socio-economic status) fathers who had been ranked in the category 'manager' had in fact been upwardly mobile but without high educational qualifications. It could be assumed that they had no cultural capital to pass on, hence the mean SES score of the school should have been lower than estimated. Even the most basic variables in school effectiveness research are theory impregnated!

References

b
BALL, S.J. (1981) Beachside Comprehensive, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
BALL, S.J. (1987) The Micro Politics of the School: London, Methuen.
BALL, S.J. (1990) Educative, Inequality & School Reform: Values in Crisis! Inaugural Lecture, Centre for Education Studies, Key's College, London.
BALL, S.J. (1996) 'Good school/Bad school', Paper presented to the BERA conference, Lancaster, September.
BALL, S. and BOWE, R. (1992) 'Subject departments and the “implementation” of National Curriculum policy: An overview of the issues', Journal of Curriculum Studies, 24, 2, pp. 97-115.
BARR, R. and DREEBEN, R. (1983) How Schools Work, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
BOWLES, S. and GINTIS, H. (1976) Schooling in Capitalist America, London: Routledge.
BROWN, P. (1987) Schooling Ordinay Kids, London: Tavistock.
BROWN, P., HALSEY, A., LAUDER, H. and STUART WELLS, A. (1997) 'The transformation of education and society', in HALSEY, A., LAUDER, H., BROWN, P. and STUART WELLS, A., (eds) Education, Culture, Economy and Society, Oxford: Oxford University Press, Chapter 1.

c
CHUBB, J. and MOE, T. (1990) Politics, Markets and America's Schools, Washington: The Brookings Institute.
COLEMAN, J., CAMPBELL, E., HOBSON, C., MCPARTLAND, J., MOOD, A., WEINFELD, F. and YORK, R. (1966) Equality of Educational Opportunity, Washington: US Government Printing Office.
COLEMAN, J. (1988) 'Social capital in the creation of human capital', in HALSEY, A., LAUDER, H., BROWN, P. and STUART WELLS, A. (eds) Education, Culture, Economy and Society, Oxford: Oxford University Press, Chapter 4.

g
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE (USA) 'Elementary school children: Many change schools frequently harming their education', Report to the Hon. Marcy Kaptur, House of Representatives, Washington D.C. Author.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
School Effectiveness for Whom? Challenges to the School Effectiveness and School Improvement Movements
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 197

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.