Sexual Violence and the Law in Japan

By Catherine Burns | Go to book overview

Series editor's foreword

The contributions of women to the social, political and economic transformations occurring in the Asian region are legion. Women have served as leaders of nations, communities, workplaces, activist groups and families. Asian women have joined with others to participate in fomenting change at the micro and macro levels. They have been both agents and targets of national and international interventions in social policy at the level of the household and family. In the performance of these myriad roles women have forged new and modern gendered identities that are recognisably global and local. Their life experiences are rich, diverse and instructive. The books in this series testify to the central role women play in creating the new Asia and re-creating Asian womanhood. Moreover, these books attest to the resilience and inventiveness of women around the Asian region in the face of entrenched and evolving patriarchal social norms.

Scholars publishing in this series demonstrate a commitment to promoting the productive conversation between Women's Studies and Asian Studies. The need to understand the diversity of experiences of femininity and womanhood around the world increases inexorably as globalisation proceeds apace. Lessons from the experiences of Asian women present us with fresh opportunities for building new possibilities for women's progress the world over.

The Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) sponsors this publication series as part of its on-going commitment to promoting knowledge about women in Asia. In particular, the ASAA women's caucus provides the intellectual vigour and enthusiasm that maintains the Women in Asia Series (WIAS). The aim of the series, since its inception in 1992, is to promote knowledge about women in Asia to both the academic and general audiences. To this end, WIAS books draw on a wide range of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, political science, cultural studies and history. The series could not function without the generous professional advice provided by many anonymous readers. WIAS, its authors and the ASAA are very grateful to these people for their expert work.

Louise Edwards (Australian National University)
Series Editor

-xi-

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Sexual Violence and the Law in Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables x
  • Series Editor's Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - Legal Storytelling and Sexual Violence 1
  • 2 - Hegemonic Masculinity and Guilty Feminine Bodies 19
  • 3 - Confronting the Japanese Criminal Justice System 44
  • 4 - Credibility in the Court 67
  • 5 - 'In Truth She Was Probably Very Drunk' 84
  • 6 - Markers of Truth 110
  • 7 - Subversive Stories and Feminist Strategies 131
  • 8 - Conclusion 159
  • Appendix 1 163
  • Appendix 2 165
  • Notes 169
  • Bibliography 180
  • Index 194
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